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Res Philosophica

Volume 90, Issue 3, July 2013

Happiness and Well-Being

Valerie Tiberius
Pages 347-364
DOI: 10.11612/resphil.2013.90.3.3

Why Be Moral? Can the Psychological Literature on Well-Being Shed any Light?

In Plato’s dialogue the Republic, Glaucon challenges Socrates to prove that the just (or moral) life is better or more advantageous than the unjust one. Socrates’s answer to the challenge is notoriously unsatisfying. Could new research on well-being in philosophy and psychology allow us to do better? After distinguishing two different approaches to the question “why be moral?” I argue that while new research on well-being does not provide an answer that would satisfy Glaucon, it does shed light on the topic. Empirical research has different implications for our prudential reasons to be moral depending on which philosophical theory of well-being is accepted. Some well-being theories sustain stronger links to morality than others, but any theory of well-being can make use of empirical research to narrow the gap between prudence and morality to some extent.

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