PDC Homepage

Home » Products » Purchase

Philosophy and Phenomenological Research

Volume 84, Issue 2, March 2012

Lionel Shapiro
Pages 378-418

Objective Being and "Ofness" in Descartes

It is generally assumed that Descartes invokes "objective being in the intellect" in order to explain or describe an idea's status as being "of something." I argue that this assumption is mistaken. As emerges in his discussion of "materially false ideas" in the Fourth Replies, Descartes recognizes two senses of 'idea of'. One, a theoretical sense, is itself introduced in terms of objective being. Hence Descartes can't be introducing objective being to explain or describe "ofness" understood in this sense. Descartes also appeals to a pretheoretical sense of 'idea of'. I will argue that the notion of objective being can't serve to explain or describe this "ofness" either. I conclude by proposing an alternative explanation of the role of objective being, according to which Descartes introduces this notion to explain the mind's ability to attain clear and distinct ideas.

Usage and Metrics
PDC