PDC Homepage

Home » Products » Purchase

American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly

Volume 92, Issue 3, Summer 2018

Religious Epistemology

Andrew James Komasinski
Pages 445-464
DOI: 10.5840/acpq2018510153

Faith, Recognition, and Community
Abraham and “Faith-In” in Hegel and Kierkegaard

This article looks at “faith-in” and what Jonathan Kvanvig calls the “belittler objection” by comparing Hegel and Kierkegaard’s interpretations of Abram (later known as Abraham). I first argue that Hegel’s treatment of Abram in Spirit of Christianity and its Fate is an objection to faith-in. Building on this from additional Hegelian texts, I argue that Hegel’s objection arises from his social command account of morality. I then turn to Johannes de Silentio’s treatments of Abraham in Fear and Trembling and Søren Kierkegaard’s Works of Love to argue that Kierkegaard defends faith-in as part of a moderate divine command account of moral knowledge. Finally, this article concludes that the belittler objection is ultimately an objection to faith-in as a divine command source of moral knowledge or obligation rather than a social command source.