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The Harvard Review of Philosophy

Volume 6, Issue 1, Spring 1996

George Boolos
Pages 62-65

The Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever

Cited by

  • Stefan Wintein. Minds and Machines. On the Behavior of True and False 2012. [CrossRef]
  • Jason Rosenhouse. The College Mathematics Journal. Knights, Knaves, Normals, and Neutrals 2014. [CrossRef]
  • Jason Rosenhouse, Peter Winkler. The American Mathematical Monthly. Reviews 2017. [CrossRef]
  • Walter Carnielli. Raymond Smullyan on Self Reference 2017: 181. [CrossRef]
  • B. Rabern, L. Rabern. Analysis. A simple solution to the hardest logic puzzle ever 2008. [CrossRef]
  • Tim S. Roberts. Journal of Philosophical Logic. Some Thoughts about the Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever 2001. [CrossRef]
  • Fenrong Liu, Yanjing Wang. Minds and Machines. Reasoning About Agent Types and the Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever 2013. [CrossRef]
  • Stefan Wintein. Studia Logica. A Framework for Riddles about Truth that do not involve Self-Reference 2011. [CrossRef]
  • G. Uzquiano. Analysis. How to solve the hardest logic puzzle ever in two questions 2010. [CrossRef]
  • David Nacin. The American Mathematical Monthly. Reviews 2021. [CrossRef]
  • Fenrong Liu, Kaile Su. Minds and Machines. Logic and AI in China: An Introduction 2013. [CrossRef]
  • Brian Rabern, Landon Rabern. Analysis. A simple solution to the hardest logic puzzle ever 2008. [CrossRef]
  • Andrew G. Buchanan, John H. Conway. Raymond Smullyan on Self Reference 2017: 165. [CrossRef]
  • Gregory Wheeler, Pedro Barahona. Journal of Philosophical Logic. Why the Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever Cannot Be Solved in Less than Three Questions 2012. [CrossRef]
  • Francesco Ciraulo, Samuele Maschio. The College Mathematics Journal. Solving Knights-and-Knaves with One Equation 2020. [CrossRef]
There may be additional citations on Google Scholar.