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Journal of Philosophical Research

Volume 38, 2013

James McGray
Pages 323-332
DOI: 10.5840/jpr20133816

Silent Reading and Conceptual Confusion
A Wittgensteinian Approach

Silent reading is markedly different from loud reading. For loud reading it is necessary that the spoken words match the printed or written words in accord with rules of pronunciation and grammar. Ordinarily, a loud reader can repeat or describe what he has read, but the acquisition of this ability is not necessary for loud reading. However, for silent reading it is necessary that the reader can repeat or describe the printed or written words that he has read. Inner voicing may be part of the experience of silent reading, but it isn’t necessary.

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