Cover of Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines

Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines

Call for Submissions

SPECIAL ISSUE

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Critical Quantitative Methodologies:
Challenging Assumptions and Advancing Social Justice in Data Analysis

Guest Editors

  • Wendy Castillo
    Princeton University

  • Elizabeth I. Rivera Rodas
    Montclair State University

Inquiry is an open-access journal. No payment is required for submission or publication. Publication of this Special Issue will be scheduled for 2025.

About this Special Issue

Critiques of quantitative methods (Annamma et al., 2014; Cowan, 1972; Hughes, 1995; Rollins, 2021; Wigfield, 2020; Zuberi & Bonilla-Silva, 2008; Anand, 1999; Garcia & Mayorga, 2018; Pager & Shepherd, 2008; Pearson & Moul, 1925) collectively argue for a critical re-evaluation of quantitative methodologies. They highlight the necessity of acknowledging and addressing the biases and ideological underpinnings that shape research processes and outcomes.

In response to these critiques, there's a growing movement within the scholarly community to reconfigure quantitative research's philosophical and ideological foundations. This involves reimagining quantitative methods to align more closely with critical theoretical traditions. Such efforts aim to ensure that quantitative research not only acknowledges its historical and ideological contexts but also actively works towards more equitable, just, and inclusive practices. Hence, this contributes to the enhancement of critical thinking across disciplines, methods, and applications.

This special issue investigates the role of critical quantitative methodologies across disciplines. Critical quantitative methods encompass broad definitions, all united by a common intent to scrutinize and challenge existing power structures and inequities through quantitative research. For example, Stage and Wells (2014) highlight the desire to mitigate inequity as a key feature of such endeavors. Strunk and Hoover (2019) advocate for a critical stance toward positivism, urging a reevaluation of its foundational assumptions. Another perspective emphasizes the importance of recognizing group labels and demographics, as Garvey (2019) noted, underscoring their significance in addressing systemic inequalities. Meanwhile, Mayhew and Simonoff (2015) suggest methodological innovations like moving beyond simple group comparisons to foster a more nuanced understanding of social dynamics.

Quantitative Critical Race Theory (QuantCrit) has emerged as a powerful framework that challenges traditional approaches to statistical data analysis within social research and has even been applied in the health sciences. Rooted in Critical Race Theory, QuantCrit interrogates the ways in which numerical data perpetuates and reflects racial biases, while advocating for a more socially just and equitable approach to research. Furthermore, the integration of quantitative methods with critical theories, notably through approaches like QuantCrit, illustrates the evolving landscape of critical quantitative research.

This special issue seeks to explore the interdisciplinary applications and implications of critical quantitative methods across various fields. We welcome empirical, theoretical, and methodological contributions from diverse disciplinary perspectives, including but not limited to sociology, education, psychology, public health, literature, behavioral science, and beyond. Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Applications of Critical Quantitative Methods (inclusive of mixed methods) in specific fields (e.g., medicine, literature, education).
  • Methodological innovations integrating Critical Quantitative Methods principles.
  • Challenges and critiques of Critical Quantitative Methods in interdisciplinary contexts.
  • Practical implications for policymakers and practitioners.
  • Ethical considerations in Critical Quantitative Methods research.
  • The teaching of Critical Quantitative Methods and Critical Thinking.

We encourage submissions that contribute to advancing the understanding and practice of critical Quantitative Methods, fostering dialogue among scholars, practitioners, and policymakers. Our aim is to facilitate an iterative process of refining and expanding the principles and methodologies of Critical Quantitative Methods, promoting rigor and accessibility in their application.

Deadlines and Submission Procedure

Please submit your abstracts by May 15, 2024. Abstracts should not exceed 500 words.

Submit abstracts by email to [email protected]. Please include "Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Critical Quantitative Methodologies" in the subject line.

Notification will occur on or before July 15, 2024.

Final manuscripts will be due on December 15, 2024.

For more information see the Submission Guidelines at https://www.pdcnet.org/inquiryct/Submission-Guidelines.


Call for Submissions

SPECIAL ISSUE

Critical Thinking: Feminist, Feminine, and/or Gendered Frameworks

Guest Editor

  • Dorothy Rogers
    Montclair State University

Inquiry is an open-access journal. No payment is required for submission or publication. Publication of this Special Issue will be scheduled for 2025.

About this Special Issue

Critical thinking has long been associated with notions of reason, analysis, skepticism, debate, dialogue, and knowledge production, often identified with a masculine and Eurocentric influence, where women’s standpoints have been marginal (reference). We want to engage in opening spaces to these alternative voices; thus, this special issue explores critical thinking, broadly conceived, from feminist, feminine, non-binary, queer, or non-gendered perspectives – and/or across intersections of race, ethnicity, or culture (reference). Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Problematizing Critical Thinking as a hegemonic masculine and cultural ideal. Power, knowledge, gender, and the constitution of critical thinking.
  • Relational or collaborative forms of critical thinking and inquiry in different disciplines.
  • The interplay of cognitive, intuitive, emotive, or embodied ways of knowing within or across disciplinary epistemologies.
  • Interrogation of the construct of disciplinary knowledge from diverse genderized standpoints.
  • The intersection of gendered ways of knowing with racial/ethnic diversity and inclusion with critical thinking and inquiry.
  • Ability/Disability vis-a-vis gender in/and critical thinking and inquiry.
  • Informal, community-based learning and knowledge production in critical thinking.
  • Critical thinking, spirituality, and gender.
  • Critical inquiry, civility, and public discourse in genderized relational ways of knowing.
  • Teaching critical thinking from a genderized way of knowing.

We encourage submissions that contribute to advancing the understanding and practice of critical Quantitative Methods, fostering dialogue among scholars, practitioners, and policymakers. Our aim is to facilitate an iterative process of refining and expanding the principles and methodologies of Critical Quantitative Methods, promoting rigor and accessibility in their application.

Deadlines and Submission Procedure

Please submit your abstracts by September 15, 2024. Abstracts should not exceed 500 words.

Submit abstracts by email to [email protected]. Please include "Feminist, Feminine, and/or Gendered Frameworks" in the subject line.

Notification will occur on or before November 15, 2024.

Final manuscripts will be due on February 15, 2025.

For more information see the Submission Guidelines at https://www.pdcnet.org/inquiryct/Submission-Guidelines.