PDC Homepage

Home » Products » Purchase

Environmental Ethics

Volume 10, Issue 2, Summer 1988

Christopher D. Stone
Pages 139-154
DOI: 10.5840/enviroethics19881022

Moral Pluralism and the Course of Environmental Ethics

Environmental ethics has reached a certain level of maturity; further significant advances require reexamining its status within the larger realm of moral philosophy. It could aim to extend to nonhumans one of the familiar sets of principles subject to appropriate modifications; or it could seek to break away and put forward its own paradigm or paradigms. Selecting the proper course requires as the most immediate mission exploring the formal requirements of an ethical system. In general, are there constraints against bringing our moral relations with different sorts of things under different mIes of govemance? In particular, how much independence can an environmental ethic (or ethics) aim to have?

Usage and Metrics
Dimensions
PDC