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1. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Philipp W. Rosemann What is Philosophy?
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2. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Christos Terezis, Lydia Petridou The Question on the Divine Distinction and the Divine Energies in Gregory Palamas
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In this study, focusing our attention on Gregory Palamas’ treatise under the title Περί θείας ενώσεως και διακρίσεως, we attempt to investigate, first of all, the volitional nature and the polymorphism of the divine energies and their relation to the divine essence. We also attempt to approach the divine distinction as a good “procession” and to prove, relying exclusively on the Christian thinker’s text, the inconsistencies according to his view that arise from the positions supported by Barlaam and Akindynos regarding the fact that the (divine) distinction is a creature. Regarding the matter on distinction, we conclude that it is a concept with a clearly different meaning when it comes to divine matters from the meaning that it gets when it concerns the created reality. From the gnoseological point of view, we focus our attention on the fact that the created beings are a source of knowledge for the revealed divine power-energy.
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3. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Dionysios Skliris Aristotelian Influences on Plotinus’ Concept of the Intellect
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4. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Christina Danko Hume, Kant and Kierkegaard: An Unlikely Trio
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At a time when certain scholars insist that the self does not exist and is not worth discussing, a return to the work of Kierkegaard proves valuable insofar as he considers this topic without appeal to abstractions and instead by way of lived experiences. My paper argues that we gain crucial insights into what constitutes Kierkegaard’s lived self by considering the trajectory of a debate between two of his most prominent predecessors, Hume and Kant. From Hume we gain an account of the problem of thinking the self abstractly (i.e., the paradox of the bundle of perceptions having to be itself a perception) and how this problem vaguely connects to the passions. From Kant we gain an account of the psychological morality framing the self and the radical evil at its heart. I suggest that Kierkegaard builds on these accounts by synthesizing their abstract components in an embodied, dynamic context, showing (not telling) how the self can be presented in everyday experiences.
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5. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Zoran Kindjić Religious Interpretation of the Meaning of Evil
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Building on the Christian and far-eastern understanding of evil, the author points out that evil that affects us can have a positive meaning. Troubles and suffering that we experience serve as a means of our purification from sin or are trials through which we gain the winning crown. God’s punishment, which primarily has an educational role, is nuanced. The guilt of an individual for violations of the divine moral order depends on the level of their consciousness, life circumstances and their social position. Since God is love, His mercy prevails over justice. God does not allow evil if good does not flow from it. Awareness that the meaning of evil that strikes us is to tear us away from a superficial, hedonistic lifestyle and turn us to God, contributes to an attitude deprived of hatred towards the enemy and those who harm us. If we understand that the enemy is merely a tool used for our moral improvement and spiritual transformation, we will focus primarily on fighting against the evil within ourselves.
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6. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Romilo Knežević Surprising God: An Ontological Proposition for Creative Monasticism
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7. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Kateřina Bauerová, Timothy Noble Orthodoxy in the West: Report on a Five-Year Research Project
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8. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Heinrich Beck Astrologie in philosophischer Sicht
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9. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Rastko Jović Scaffolds of the Church: Towards Poststructural Ecclesiology
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10. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Georgios Vlantis The Ways of Orthodox Theology in the West
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11. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Vukašin Milićević A Contribution to the Understanding of the Mutual Definition of the Aeon and Time in Ambigua 10
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In this paper, I will propose an interpretation of the mutual definition of aeon and time from St. Maximus’ Amb. 10 based on its conceptual and contextual proximity to another one that we find in Ad Thalassium 61 and which deals with the concepts of monad and myriad. I will try to show in which way, through these definitions of aeon and time and monad and myriad, St. Maximus gives us a logical device and frame for his christologicaly founded doctrine of the divinization of man.
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12. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Maksim Vasiljević Idealizing Politics Abolishes the Eschaton: On Democracy, Human Rights, and Human Dignity
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13. Philotheos: Volume > 17
Václav Ježek Emotions and their role in Theology: (Being emotion-full in an emotionless age)
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14. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Zdravko Jovanović Cyprian’s Communal Model of Episcopal Ministry and Governance
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15. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Christos Terezis, Lydia Petridou Ontological and Epistemological Approaches of Proclus in the Process of Psychogony
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This study presents the way in which Proclus structures some aspects of his Epistemology on the basis of his metaphysical Ontology. All those that we discuss – relying on his comments on Parmenides (Εἰς τὸν Πλάτωνος Παρμενίδην) (816.11– 819.29) –, take into account the following: a) his theory on the universal Intellect and the individual intellects, b) his theory on the universal Soul and the individual souls, c) some approaches of his in Plato’s theory of Ideas. Combining the above, our purpose is also to show in what way some specific manifestations of the metaphysical world are connected with the natural world. The Neoplatonist philosopher explains the relevant theories by following a clearly defined method and that is why his analyses compose a cohesive system or a coherent Epistemology. He follows the principles that he has established on the basis of a clear ontological realism, which is based on his views about how the similarities and the differences between the two worlds appear. By elaborating these principles, we come to the conclusion that the methodological tools used by him are the principle of analogy, analytical thinking and hypothetical syllogisms.
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16. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Philipp W. Rosemann God and Mammon: Fundamental Structures in Georg Simmel’s Philosophy of Money
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17. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Bogdan Lubardić Faith, Science and the Question of Death: Retrieving the Philosophical Vision of Nikolai F. Fyodorov
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In this study I critically discuss the religious philosophy of Nikolai F. Fyodorov. Beforehand I will offer a synoptic overview of its key components. The thought of Fyodorov may serve as a model for case study work in regard to two crucial questions: (1) What is the relation between the past and the future? and (2) What is the relation between faith and science? These questions receive their spiritual, theological and philosophical answers through Fyodorov’s reflection on the (3) overcoming of death. In offering his answers Fyodorov taps into the innermost depths of Christian spirituality which is interpreted in ways which are not always ‘Orthodox’ in the conventional sense. On one hand he offers a vision which prophetically yet idiosyncratically anticipates the “resurrection of all by all” (viz. Philosophy of the Common Task): this in itself calls for a radical revision of humanity’s guiding ethical, political and cultural principles (viz. Supramoralism). On the other hand, he expounds visionary proposals for the role science has to play precisely within the project of resurrecting the deceased and restoring free conscious life to all being (viz. Regulation). Fyodorov is acclaimed as one of the pioneering anticipators of climatology, rocket and space astronautics, cryonics, genetic engineering, cloning and body re-design; also, he is endorsed as the forerunner of Russian cosmism and influencer of transhumanism. His thought is radical, maximalist and limital. As well, it is informed by the purity of a moral saintliness. Inasmuch his philosophical vision may help us re-examine our own understanding of the relation of the past to the future, as well as the relation of faith to science, and, to re-address the predicament of dying. For the same reason it allows us to metacritically examine the neuralgic points of Fyodorov’s proposals. Lastly, I strive to reflect the mentioned problematic within a historical perspective, hermeneutically, hoping to provide orientation points for further discussion.
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18. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
L. V. Vyskochkov, A. A. Shelaeva, O. B. Sokurova “Russian Paris” and the Rising Star of Nikolay Gumilyov
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The article is dedicated to the early, Paris period of life and literary work of Nikolay Gumilyov (1906–1908), which is still insufficiently studied and understood by scholars. The paper aims to study the influence of this period on shaping Gumilyov’s personality and his spiritual values and aspirations, polishing of his literary taste, gradual gaining of an independent ideological and aesthetic platform and development of his inimitable poetic style. – The research for the paper was based on the comprehensive historical and cultural approach, with application of literary and historical analysis techniques. This approach was used to consider the memoirs of his contemporaries, Gumilyov’s letters to Valery Bryusov, as well as his poetry, prose and art criticism during that period. Particular attention is paid to the history of publishing Sirius magazine and to such poorly studied aspects as the symbolic meaning of the magazine name and the first manifestations of acmeism in its aesthetic platform. The authors emphasize the fruitful and creative character of Gumilyov’s friendship with Sirius co-editor, artist and art critic M.V. Farmakovsky, whose name is unfairly forgotten. – They come to the conclusion that the “first Paris period” was not only the novice time for Gumilyov but also the start of his personal and creative self-identity. It was in Paris that the strong and persistent character of the poet was formed, his skills honed and his inimitable style created, with the colour-sound synthesis of the striking romantic picturesqueness and a clear strong word. Paris was the place of polishing the artistic taste, developing a comprehensive system of views, finding main poetic motifs and setting life goals of Gumilyov, a rising star of the Silver Age.
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19. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Iuliu-Marius Morariu Nikos Nissiotis – an Orthodox Approach of the Mission
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Important personality of the Orthodox and Ecumenical Theology, Nikos Nissiotis has offered many contributions in topics like the Orthodox Ecclesiology, Eschatology, Christology, Theology of Second Vatican Council, Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry, and s. o. He was also active part of the Ecumenical Movement and, as professor at Bossey Ecumenical Institute and member of different commissions of WCC, has also issued a lot of documents very useful until today in the ecumenical dialogue. As Orthodox observer at Second Vatican Council, he published also some important articles, often quoted, on this topic. Also of his important contributions is in the understanding of mission through an ecumenical context, but from an Orthodox point of view. Despite of its importance, this contribution of the aforementioned author was not enough highlighted until now. Therefore, analysing his most important publications dedicated to this topic, we will try there to emphasize his contribution on it.
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20. Philotheos: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Theodros Assefa Teklu Economic Scarcity, Divine Fecundity: Moral Considerations
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Current philosophical and theological trends tend to privilege a normative vision of abundance over that of scarcity. Consequently, the role the concept of scarcity once played in political reflection is undermined. Contra these trends, I shall make an appraisal for the necessity of re-thinking scarcity and such rethinking, if harnessed properly, will help us to direct theological and political reflection towards a concern for limitation. To this end, drawing on Jean-Paul Sartre and Sergei Bulgakov, this paper seeks to inquire as to what it might mean to speak of a milieu of scarcity while considering the scope available to express this within moral-philosophical discourse.
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