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1. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Charles Péguy Liberté
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2. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
P. Ian Boyd, C.S.B. Avant-propos de l’éditeur
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3. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Patrick Kéchichian La revue des livres
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4. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Brian J. Sudlow Le Réalisme catholique: terrain commun entre les lettres catholiques en France et en Angleterre
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5. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Philippe Maxence La France et Chesterton, une « divine entente »
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6. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Dermot Quinn La conversion au Dieu caché: Chesterton, Claudel et la renaissance de la littérature catholique
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7. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
P. Ian Boyd, C.S.B. Chesterton et les renouveaux littéraires en France et en Angleterre au XXᵉ siècle
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8. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Paul Claudel Adresse de Paul Claudel à G.K. Chesterton
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9. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Alain Lanavère 1926. Un coup de tonnerre: Sous le Soleil de Satan
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10. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
G. K. Chesterton G.K. Chesterton et le curé d’Ars
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11. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Lettres
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12. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
G. K. Chesterton Comprendre la France
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13. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Philippe Maxence Introduction
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14. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Nouvelles et commentaires
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15. The Chesterton Review en Français: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
G. K. Chesterton L’affaire Claudel
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16. Chôra: Volume > 17
Olivier Renaut Le plaisir dans la cite platonicienne
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This article aims at showing that the definition of pleasure in Plato’s dialogues cannot be separated from a political educational program and an anthropology that consider pleasure as the main vehicle towards virtue. The political use of pleasure is as important as its definition, insofar as its manifestation and content are the prerogatives of the legislator. All pleasures are politically meaningful in the Republic and in the Laws, and among them especially the triad hunger, thirst and sex ; in making pleasures a “public” issue, as pleasures are object of surveillance and political control, Plato gives several means in order to shape the way pleasures are felt in the city, and in order to make the community of pleasure and pain a fundamental role in unifying the city under the reason’s commands.
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17. Chôra: Volume > 17
Anca Vasiliu Note liminaire
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18. Chôra: Volume > 17
Annick Jaulin, Michel Crubellier Présentation
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19. Chôra: Volume > 17
Charlotte Murgier Platon et les plaisirs de la vertu
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How does Plato conceive the pleasures attendant on the virtuous life? Does he provide a specific account of them ? By reading through key passages from Laws book 5, Republic book 9 and the Philebus, I try to assess the way Plato endeavours to demonstrate that the virtuous life is also happy and thereby pleasant. I investigate to what extent these texts put forward any specificity of the pleasures of being virtuous, and how far the account they provide harmonizes with Plato’s general views about pleasure.
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20. Chôra: Volume > 17
Karine Tordo·Rombaut Protagoras 351b3‑358d4 : le plaisir et rien d’autre
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In Protagoras 351b3‑358d4, Socrates apparently admits the use of pleasure and pain as criteria for distinguishing between good and bad. Focusing on this passage, my paper outlines three problems, raising from : (1) the contradiction between Socrates’ objection to pleasure in other platonic dialogues and his assent here to a hypothesis which identifies good with pleasure ; (2) the petitio principii apparently involved in Socrates’ argument to support the thought that knowledge is more powerful than emotions ; (3) the compatibility of his “ hedonist ” hypothesis with his “intellectualist” thought. My paper undertakes to reconstruct Socrates’ argument, in order to answer problem (2). I contend that this argument makes the humans admit they are deprived of the knowledge both of good and evil and of pleasant and painful, a point sufficient to silence them when they speak of “knowledge being defeated by pleasure”. This contention helps answering problem (1), through a distinction between so‑called pleasures (to which Socrates objects) and real ones (which he might accept). My conclusion answers problem (3), by showing that, held together, both the “hedonist” hypothesis and the “intellectualist” thought lead to not take pleasure for granted, as required to secure a philosophical approach.
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