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1. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1/2
Michael C. McCarthy, S.J. Interpreting Augustine: Mirrors, Models, and the Middle Voice
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2. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1/2
Lewis Ayres “Where Does the Trinity Appear?” Augustine’s Apologetics and “Philosophical” Readings of the De Trinitate
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3. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1/2
Robert Louis Wilken Augustine’s World and the World of Cyril of Alexandria
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4. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1/2
Willemien Otten Between Praise and Appraisal: Medieval Guidelines for the Assessment of Augustine’s Intellectual Legacy
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5. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1/2
James Wetzel Saint Augustine Lecture 2012: A Tangle of Two Cities
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6. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Melanie Webb “On Lucretia who slew herself”: Rape and Consolation in Augustine’s De ciuitate dei
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7. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Ellen R. Scully De Musica as the Guide to Understanding Augustine’s Trinitarian Numerology in the De Trinitate
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8. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
J. Patout Burns Marital Fidelity as a remedium concupiscentiae: An Augustinian Proposal
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9. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Paul Rigby Was Augustine a Narcissist?
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10. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Brian Dunkle, S.J. Humility, Prophecy, and Augustine’s Harmony of the Gospels
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11. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Francis X. Gumerlock Arnobius the Younger against the “Predestined One”: Was Prosper of Aquitaine the Predestinarian Opponent of Arnobius the Younger?
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12. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Joseph T. Leinhard, S.J. From Gwatkin Onwards: A Guide through a Century and a Quarter of Studies on Arianism
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13. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Walter Dunphy, SVD Glosses on Glosses: On the Budapest Anonymous and Pseudo-Rufinus: A Study on Anonymous Writings in Pelagian circles (Part 1)
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14. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Gert Partoens Augustine on Predestination, Immortal Babies, and Sinning Foetuses: A Rhetorical Analysis of Sermon 165
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15. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
John Meinert Ne Deficiat Fides Tua: A Systematic Position on Perseverance in the Mature Augustine
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16. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Robert Dodaro, OSA Language Matters: Augustine’s Use of Literary Decorum in Theological Argument
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17. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Walter Dunphy, SVD Glosses on Glosses: On the Budapest Anonymous and Pseudo-Rufinus: A Study on Anonymous Writings in Pelagian Circles (Part 2)
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18. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 2
Fr. David Vincent Meconi, S.J. Ravishing Ruin: Self-Loathing in Saint Augustine
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Why are we sometimes drawn to our own pain, fascinated with our own melancholy? How is it that we can choose to injure ourselves and to rebel against our innate hunger for wholeness and perfection? This article discusses St. Augustine’s understanding of self-loathing and how it stems from the Fall and a consequent false love of self. Augustine analyzed sin as a way of establishing myself as my own sovereign, creating an idol which must eventually be pulled down if I am to be made whole. For Augustine, then, sin destroys that which had already become tarnished through his own bad choices. However, he also taught that the incarnate Word steps into this vicious cycle of self-destruction in order to call each person into a conscious and confessional relationship with himself.
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19. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 2
Tarmo Toom Augustine’s Case for the Multiplicity of Meanings
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Augustine was a convinced proponent of the multiplicity of meanings. He had both theoretical and theological reasons for affirming the phenomenon of polysemy. This article deduces seven themes from Augustine’s exegetical practice and from his discussions of the principles of his exegesis, and employs these as Augustine’s arguments for the multiplicity of meanings. Augustine acknowledges the legitimacy of the many senses of the Word of God. Because scripture is an ambiguous linguistic reality, it constitutes a system of (linguistic) signs and it reuses earlier texts to convey new meanings. Augustine’s theological reasons for the multiplicity of meanings include the beliefs that human authorial intention is complemented by the primary divine intention, that scripture has to be interpreted Christologically, that scripture’s interpretations have to be spiritually useful, and that the texts of scripture are part of the new theological/literary context of the canon.
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20. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 45 > Issue: 2
Han-luen Kantzer Komline Grace, Free Will, and the Lord’s Prayer: Cyprian’s Importance for the “Augustinian” Doctrine of Grace
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Beginning in the second phase of the Pelagian controversy, Augustine repeatedly refers to Cyprian’s little work on the Lord’s Prayer to defend his perspective on grace. In this text, Augustine claims, one finds an unambiguous precedent for his controversial teaching. The following article assesses the validity and significance of Augustine’s appeal to Cyprian. First, I show that this appeal offered obvious strategic advantages, which may help to explain why Augustine cited Cyprian by name more than he did any other author from the early church, excepting only the apostle Paul. I next turn to evaluate the material basis for Augustine’s appeal to Cyprian, showing that Cyprian does indeed support Augustine’s case against a more “Pelagian” view of grace in three major areas. Finally, I argue for the possibility that Cyprian’s work influenced Augustine’s mature thinking on grace. In sum, this article shows the crucial importance of Cyprian’s On the Lord’s Prayer for Augustine’s view of grace, which courses through the heart of his theology. Augustine is no David who takes on the “Pelagian” opposition alone. Like David, however, he does pluck a lethal set of stones from a stream that has worn them smooth. Augustine’s stream flows from Cyprian.
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