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Displaying: 91-100 of 177 documents

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91. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 2
Chandana Chakrabarti Beginninglessness of the Self
92. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 2
B. N. Narahari Achar A Mesopotamian Origin for Vedaanga Jyotisha: is it Justified?
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The astronomical knowledge codified in the Vedaanga Jyotisha is entirely traceable to Vedic sources. Furthermore, in view of the works of Seidenberg on the ritual origin of geometry, and of Kak on the astronomical code in the Vedas, it is argued that the Mesopotamian origin for Vedaanga Jyotisha proposed by Pingree is not justified.
93. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 2
Sukharanjan Saha Translation and Elucidation of Definitions of Svaprakāśatva in Citsukha's Tattvapradīpikā
94. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 2
Lobsang Gyatso Interview with Ven. Lobsang Gyatso
95. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 2
Jay L. Garfield Three Natures and Three Naturelessnesses: Comments Concerning Cittamātra Conceptual Categories
96. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 20
Sukharanjan Saha A Comparative Appraisal of Nyaya and Advaita Vedanta Theories of Perception
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Our aim is to give an idea of the Nyaya and Advaita theories of perception and to note metaphysical or ontological elements in them. We shall consider whether it is possible to sieve out features of the theories without such elements with a view to formulating a commonly acceptable platform for dialogue regarding a theory of perception. In recent times scholars have attempted to pick up common elements in the two theories. In our account we may, however, be allowed to use Sanskrit philosophical words in original. This is perhaps useful for philosophizing freely in a comparative setting.
97. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 20
Tommi Lehtonen The Concept of a Point of View: The Law Code of Manu as an application case
98. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 20
Stephen Phillips Yoga and Nyāya
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Largely unnoticed in textbook accounts of classical Indian philosophic schools is Nyāya's advocacy of yoga and its alliance with teachings of the Yoga-sūtra. Yoga and Nyāya differ sharply in how nature is viewed, its components and causal laws. But on the side of subjectivity, purusa and atman, there is more convergence than difference. The two world views have distinct theories of action, cognition, and the body, but concerning the subject or self himself or herself, including God or the īsvara (and argumentation so directed), the conceptions advanced are surprisingly similar. Moreover, the traditions converge in the commen taries of the tenth-century philosopher Vācaspati Miśra who often shows influence from one or the other direction in his Yoga-sūtra and Nyāya-sūtra commentaries. The key bridge ideas are expressed in the Nyāya-sūtra literature under a substantial and remarkable stretch of sutras in the fourth chapter devoted to yoga practice and liberating self knowledge: NyS 4.2.38-51. Among other jewels, here we find an implicit assimilation of philosophic debate as a yoga practice.
99. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 20
B. N. Hebbar Some pros and cons of Madhva's Scriptural Interpretations and Doctrines
100. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 20
Michael Allen Truth and Reasonableness in Gandhi and Rawls: Satyagraha without Suffering?