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Displaying: 91-100 of 151 documents

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91. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
William E. Murnion Telling the Truth and Doing Good: A Key to the Infrastructure of Modern Philosophy
92. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Dedication
93. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
About the Authors
94. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Gregory P. Floyd Book Review: Finding the Mind: Pedagogy for Verifying Cognitional Theory, by Catherine Blanche King
95. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Christopher Friel Lonergan’s Economics and Value Theory
96. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Gregory P. Floyd A Hermeneutic of Generosity: Lonergan’s Rereadings of Phenomenology
97. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
John Little Thomas V. Daly, S.J.: Map-Maker of the Human Spirit
98. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Morag McAleese Introduction: Applying Lonergan
99. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Patrick H. Byrne Moral Conversion: The Stripping Away of Self-Delusion
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While Lonergan wrote a great deal about intellectual and religious conversion, he wrote comparatively little about moral conversion. Hence, Lonergan’s writings on moral conversionraise a number of important questions, but do not explicitly answer them. This essay offers an interpretation that endeavors to answer some of these questions. In doing so, it illustrates key elements in both Lonergan’s explicit statements about, and my own understanding of moral conversion by considering three case studies: Katherine Anne Power, St. Augustine, and Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, the protagonist of by Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel, Crime and Punishment. In particular, it focuses on the process of stripping away of self-delusions that is an intricate part of moral conversion.
100. The Lonergan Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Christine Jamieson, Hazel Markwelli Values Integration and Values Conflict in Healthcare: Lonergan’s Contribution
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Healthcare workers are, of necessity, oriented toward immediate action in addressing urgent, concrete situations. This is particularly true in acute care settings such as Intensive Care Units, Critical Care Units and Emergency rooms in Hospitals. At the same time, healthcare workers suffer significantly higher levels of moral distress than other types of workers. transcendental mode, something that is particularly challenging in goal oriented healthcare workers. This paper draws on data collected from several research studies conducted in hospitals in Canada. The research was done through the lens of Lonergan’s transcendental method and his work on values and bias.