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81. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Carlo Ierna Husserl and the Infinite
82. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Robin D. Rollinger Husserl’s Elementary Logic: The 1896 Lectures in their Nineteenth Century Context
83. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Dale Jacquette Meinong on the Phenomenology of Assumption
84. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Ion Tănăsescu, Victor Popescu Introduction
85. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3/4
Leonard Lawlor Essence and Language: The Rupture in Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy
86. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3/4
Adina Bozga Merleau-Ponty, Henry and Laruelle on Dualism: From phenomenology to non-philosophy, and back
87. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: Special
Rudolf Lüthe The Evil Heart: On Normal and Radical Evil in Human Nature
88. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: Special
Elizabeth A. Behnke Contact Improvisation and the Lived World
89. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1/2
Nader El-Bizri On ΚΑΙ ΧΩΡΑ: Situating Heidegger Between the Sophist and the Timaeus
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In attempting to address the heideggerian Seinsfrage, by way of situating it between the platonic conception of ̉όν in the Sophist and of χώρα in the Timaeus, this paper investigates the ontological possibilities that are opened up in terms of rethinking space. Asserting the intrinsic connection between the question of being and that of space, we argue that the maturation of ontology as phenomenology would not unfold in its furthermost potential unless the being of space gets clarified. This state of affairs confronts us with the exacting ontological task to found a theory of space that contributes to an explication of the question of being beyond its associated temporocentric determinations. Consequently, our line of inquiry endeavors herein to constitute a prologmenon to the elucidation of the question of the being of space as “ontokhorology.”
90. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1/2
Tracy Colony Heidegger’s Early Nietzsche Lecture Courses and the Question of Resistance
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It is well known that Heidegger described his Nietzsche lecture courses as confrontations with National Socialism. Traditionally, this sense of resistance was seen firstly in the fact that Heidegger read Nietzsche at the level of metaphysics and explicitly rejected those ideological appropriations which attempted to reduce Nietzsche’s philosophy to the level of biologism or mere Weltanschauung. This essay argues that the way in which Heidegger framed his interpretation of will to power in his first and second Nietzsche lecture courses can be seen to contain a more explicit critique of the contemporaneous “official” Nietzschebild than has customarily been said.
91. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Alexandru Dragomir, James Christian Brown Utter Metaphysical Banalities
92. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Alexandru Dragomir, James Christian Brown About The Ocean of Forgetting
93. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Gabriel Liiceanu The Notebooks from Underground
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The article leads us through the life story of Alexandru Dragomir, starting from his early years as a student of Heidegger's in Freiburg and all through the communist period, which for Dragomir meant the impossibility of openly practicing philosophy. However he never gave up his private endeavours with philosophy; instead he practiced it “underground”, revealing the results of his thinking to very few close friends. The second half of the article deals with Dragomir's intellectual portrait: the Heideggerian heritage, the task of thinking, time. As he never actually published anything, it was only after his death that his friends discovered his notebooks, which are now being gradually published at Humanitas Publishing House.
94. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Andrei Pleşu, James Christian Brown Alexandru Dragomir: Fragments of a Portrait
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The article conveys the portrait of a man for whom understanding was a matter of the highest spiritual intimacy, a man who continuously disregarded his possible engagement in the public life as a philosopher, finally a man whom we find, in the twilight of his life, concerned with the intricate tension between the “muteness” of philosophy (as being able “only” to double life by means of rational discourse) and religion. Alexandru Dragomir’s portrait is portrayed in comparison to another important Romanian philosopher, Constantin Noica. The comparison is not accidental, since they both come to represent two paradigmatic ways of making philosophy: traditional ontology (centered around Descartes – Kant – Hegel) vs. modern phenomenology (centered around Husserl – Heidegger)
95. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Horia-Roman Patapievici, Paul Balogh The Lesson of Alexandru Dragomir
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The paper aims to clarify several key aspects of Alexandru Dragomir: his amazing “technique” of keeping his entire knowledge in perfect working condition, his exceptional precision of references and his continuous disregard concerning writing. The root of all these peculiarities is traced back to Plato’s cognitive and moral arguments against writing, as expressed in Phaedrus and Seventh Letter. Finally, the article brings to light what seems to be the lesson of Dragomir’s life as a thinker: to rely only on the living thought, that which is written “inside the soul”.
96. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Catalin Partenie Archive Relief: Dragomir’s Perspective
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Dragomir was not interested in writing philosophy, although his archive amounts to almost 100 notebooks, containing fragments, notes, essays and studies. This essay addresses Dragomir’s disregard for written philosophy and argues that his main message will lose its force in his posthumously published archive. His message, as it emerges from the way he lived his life, is, I argue, this: if we are to restore the lost harmony of our lives, philosophy, as essential as it may be, isn’t everything.
97. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Adina Bozga Walter Biemel – Alexandru Dragomir: A Letter (1946)
98. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Paul Balogh, Cristian Ciocan Alexandru Dragomir: A Romanian Phenomenologist (1916-2002)
99. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3/4
Alexandru Dragomir, James Christian Brown About the world we live in
100. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 5
Theodore Kisiel Review and Overview of Recent Heidegger Translations and Their German Originals: A Grassroots Archival Perspective
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This survey seeks to define the present situation and climate for translating Heidegger into English after the disastrous translation (1999) of the Beiträge, Heidegger’s second magnum opus after Sein und Zeit. The 12 translations that have appeared since then tend to handle Heidegger’s neologisms in less ludicrous ways and continue to find ways to bend the highly restrictive rules imposed on translations by Heidegger’s literary executor. There are still errors of omission and commission in the German originals that carry over into the translations. A few of the English translators add to the errors of omission and commission but most tend to be competent and conscientious, producing excellent results. Yet even the best translators slack off in their production of the permitted glossaries, which are indispensable for demarcating Heidegger’s terminology in the time period involved and provide the reader a starting basis for an index, which is prohibited.