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81. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 3 > Issue: 7
Johanna Drucker Speculative Aesthetics and Digital Media
82. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 3 > Issue: 7
Tyrus Miller Enacted Time: Promising, Forgiving, and Forgetting in the World of Appearances
83. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 3 > Issue: 7
Marjorie Perloff “Easter 1916”: Yeats’s World War I Poem
84. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Rama Lohani-Chase Political (W)holes: Post-colonial Identity, Contingency of Meaning and History in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children
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This paper considers Salman Rushdie’s location as a migrant writer of the postcolonial generation while looking at criticism on his writing style by foregrounding ways in which Rushdie writes about history, reality and identity in Midnight’s Children. Underlying Rushdie’s deconstructive playfulness is a radical political spirit envisioning a humanism beyond the rigid constructions of a self/other duality, Hindu/Muslim identity, or Eastern/Western dichotomy. Furthermore, Rushdie opens up a discourse on being and belonging as a legitimate place/space for those stranded in that “strange middle ground, trapped between belief and disbelief.” According to Rushdie, this space, this middle ground, which he terms the “third principle,” could be tapped to decolonize place as well as minds. The paper also analyzes how Rushdie uses the metaphors of the “whole” and “hole” in Midnight’s Children to show he writes the story of the colonial, national and postcolonial condition from the place of the personal, where personal body politics meets the geographic body politics of a whole Indian sub-continent.
85. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Peter Nicholls, Yubraj Aryal On New Modernist Studies
86. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
G. John M. Abbarno The New Frontier of Ethics: Values and the Moral Brain
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The empirical investigations over the past fifteen years of evolutionary biologists and cognitive scientists have demonstrated the accessibility and power of the human brain. Whatever moral concepts used to acknowledge the normative appraisals of human conduct are now explained through neurological hardwiring. This essay outlines some of the main views of proponents, but especially Marc Hauser, and I argue that it does not render the end of morals. It does provide an opportunity to view the facts of how the brain functions but this essay finds a large domain of valuing unable to be justified by these new scientific challenges.
87. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Zachary Davis Aging and Social Justice: A Phenomenological Investigation
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In this paper, I provide a phenomenological account of aging and show how this account can address forms of age discrimination and injustice. Such an account is becoming increasingly critical as the welfare state attempts to adjust to the aging populations of the post-industrial countries. My primary focus is the relation between aging and time. Part 1 of this study describes how time consciousness is transformed by the experience of aging, demonstrating the unique and heterogeneous quality of one's life time. Part 2 suggests how phenomenology can function as a type of critical gerontology in examining the management and production of discrimination in the time of aging.
88. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Geoffrey Harpham How Does Literature Teach Ethics?
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The connection between literature and ethical pedagogy, intuited by many, is notoriously difficult to describe. In this essay, I discuss three ways that literature connects with ethics. The first is through form, which involves a passage or transition from “is” to “ought”; through literary language, which disturbs the habitual connections between words and things and reveals fissures over by custom and ideology; and third, through the representation of life in its contingencies, which reveals the limitations of theories, precepts, and abstractions.
89. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Hilary Putnam On Computational Psychology
90. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
David E. Schrader Globalization and Human Values: Promises and Challenges
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In this paper I argue for an account of the evolution of human values according to which it is only through the resolution of local conflicts that broader social values develop. Global issues can only be understood as issues of increasingly broadening our understanding of the local, our understanding of who are the neighbors with whom we must productively and amicably engage. My analysis argues primarily for open dialogue based on listening carefully and maintaining a strong awareness of our own areas of systematic blindness to those with whom we disagree. While my approach offers no recipe here to guarantee successful resolution to value conflict, any other approach is far more likely to lead to failure.
91. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Arun Kumar Pokhrel Representations of Time and Memory in Holocaust Literature: A Comparison of Charlotte Delbo’s Days and Memory and Ida Fink’s Selected Stories
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This essay analyzes the representations of time and memory in Holocaust literature through a comparative study of Charlotte Delbo’s memoir Days and Memory and Ida Fink’s three stories “A Scrap of Time,” “A Second Scrap of Time,” and “Traces.” Although both the writers make use of time and memory to represent the Holocaust, their ways of representation vary significantly. Memory and time are used in Delbo to show the timelessness in complex layers of memory and to recreate a reality through inventive narrative style. Whereas, in Fink, they are used to delineate the scraps of time in the ruins of memory and to create a tragic domestic reality through conventional narrativity. Moreover, this essay cautions against the danger of misrepresentation of memory as “amnesia,” often represented in the canonical postmodernist views of memory.
92. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Bed P. Paudyal Mimesis in Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory
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The essay focuses on the concept of mimesis Theodor W. Adorno developed in his Aesthetic Theory. After outlining key motifs of Adorno’s critical theory so as to provide the overall intellectual context, it explains why for Adorno mimesis enacts an ethical relation to the (non-identical) other. Mimesis for Adorno, the paper suggests, counters the violence that reason inflicts on the objects of its cognition by reconstituting the latter in terms of reason’s concepts. The essay discusses mimesis also in relation to other aesthetic concepts that dialectically interanimate in Adorno’s explication. It ends with very provisional thoughts on the possibilities, or lack thereof, Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory offers for the aesthetic practices of historically marginalized constituencies.
93. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
John Zijiang Ding Indian Yoni-Linga and Chinese Yin-Yang: Conceptual Comparisons
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Indian philosophy of Yoni-Linga may be examined as a parallel to the Chinese philosophy of “Yin-Yang.” This essay will compare the similarities and distinctions between the two kinds of dichotomies through a theoretical formulation: certain conceptual, analytical and cross-cultural perspectives. The study will be focused on semiologieal, aesthetical, ontological and theological comparisons between these two of the most famous pairs of conceptual antonyms which have been developed by later Sino-Hindu philosophies and theologies as human worldviews widened and deepened with Eastern civilization.
94. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Markus Gabriel The Dialectic of the Absolute: Hegel’s Critique of Transcendent Metaphysics
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The paper reconstructs Hegel’s repudiation of any kind of transcendent metaphysics. Hegel argues that transcendent metaphysics is dialectically incoherent because it mistakes its own reflection for an absolute independent of reflection. Hence, it is subject to a reification of philosophical thought. This entails that the relation between logic and philosophy of nature in Hegel must not be interpreted as any kind of emanation. Otherwise, Hegel would himself be subject to his effective critique of transcendent metaphysics.
95. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Kathleen Haney Empathy and Otherness
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This reflection on the phenomenological analysis of empathy according to Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein suggests a basic structure for getting to know and retain other consciousness within a single unitary sphere of consciousness. Empathy provides the access to an other that does not absorb the other’s stream of consciousness. Rather, empathy is the possibility for the intersubjective intention of a shared world of space and time. Unless the I inculcates other consciousness within itself, the I cannot recognize itself as one among others.
96. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
William L. McBride, Yubraj Aryal Global Philosophy: Some Current Issues
97. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Susan Stewart Poetry and the Senses
98. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Daniel W. Smith Deleuze’s Concept of the Virtual and the Critique of the Possible
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This paper sketches out what I take to be the component elements of Deleuze’s concept of the virtual. Deleuze develops this concept in his 1968 Difference and Repetition, in which he offers a critique, following Bergson, of the concept of the possible. The virtual-actual couple is thus meant to replace the possible-real opposition, which is incapable of accounting for difference, or the production of new. In this way, I how that Deleuze develops the concept of the virtual in response to Salomon Maimon’s claim, against Kant, that transcendental philosophy must provide the conditions of real experience, and not merely the conditions of possible experience.
99. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Tsenay Serequeberhan African Philosophy as the Practice of Resistance
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The basic concern of the paper is to state what the practice of African Philosophy is and should be in view of the contemporary dismal situation of postcolonial Africa. The attempt is to articulate a conception of African philosophy as a critical un-packing of the ideas and conceptions that legitimated European expansion and to this day–having been internalized by the Westernized African elite–sanction Western hegemony. And so, along with the critique of Eurocentrism the paper explores what it means to “return to the source” and to reclaim our “generic human identity.” The aim, in all of this, is to articulate a conception of African philosophy as a critical and combative hermeneutics of the contemporary African situation.
100. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Amrita Ghosh Carlyle, Mill, Bodington and the Case of 19th Century Imperialized Science
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The latter half of nineteenth-century England was rife with the evolution question. As English imperialism also reached its pinnacle during this time, racial gradations and superiority of the white race in the newly formed human chain loomed large culturally. In 1849, Thomas Carlyle anonymously published his anti-emancipationist perspective in “The Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question,” followed by John Stuart Mill’s divergent response to him in 1850 titled, “The Negro Question.” In 1878, The Westminster Review also published a woman’s perspective, “The Importance of Race and Its Bearing on the Negro Question” by Alice Bodington, which resembled the Carlyle essay in various ways. Although Mill’s essay was a direct attack on Carlyle’s explosive article and is overtly against Carlyle and Bodington’s ideas, this paper argues that an imperialist agenda underlies Mill’s views and in fact poses the same theories of Carlyle and Bodington. The paper first proceeds to interrogate Mill’s hegemonic subtext through a comparison of these three essays by situating them within the scientific discourse of the era, arguing that science, especially phrenology and evolution theories, didn’t exist in a vacuum, but was used to perpetrate the normative racial ideologies of the period. The paper also uses Edward Said’s theory of ‘Othering the Orient’ in Culture and Imperialism to show that while Mill seemingly diverges from Carlyle’s stance, this ‘othering’ is in fact present in all three writers’ works.