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81. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Lawrence Little Confronting the Lies: Blood Done Sign My Name and American Racism
82. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Sean Byrne, Christopher Cunningham, Eyob Fissuh Getting to Peace: The Role of the European Union Peace 1 Fund in Building the Peace Dividend in Northem Ireland
83. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Peter C. Phan Peacemaking and Reconciliation: Roman Catholic Teachings in the Context of Interreligious Dialogue
84. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Haig Khatchadourian Addressing Root-Causes of Global Terrorism
85. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Saul Tobias Affliction, Post-Secularism, and the Plight of Refugees
86. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Ron Large Righteous Resistance: The Religious Roots of Nonviolence in Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Ir.
87. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Kai Nielsen Solidarity Ideally Conceived and Really Existing Solidarities
88. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Suzanne C. Toton Solidarity Transforming a University The UCA: A Case Study
89. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
David I. Gandolfo A Role for the Privileged?: Solidarity and the University in the Work of Ignacio Ellacuria and Paulo Freire
90. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Sally J. Scholz From Global Justice to Global Solidarity: Editor’s Introduction
91. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
William Vos, Agnes Kithikii, Ron Pagnucco A Case Study in Global Solidarity: The St. Cloud-Homa Bay Partnership
92. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
J. Milburn Thompson Catholic Social Teaching And The Ethics Of Torture
93. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
David Oughton Religions and Peace: Globally And Locally
94. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
George Hunsinger Torture Is The Ticking Time Bomb: Why The Necessity Defense Fails
95. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Matthew Gaudet From The Ashes: Jus Post Bellum And The Emergence Of Kosovo
96. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Gordon Bazemore Getting and Keeping It Real: Less than Perfect Restorative Justice Intervention and the Value of Small Connections
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Despite a wide range of restorative practices in use around the world, most recent research has been focused on one model, family group conferencing. In part due to the salience and appeal of Braithwaite’s reintegrative shaming theory, this important emphasis on the role of structured dialogue with family and intimates privileges an emotional connection that elicits reintegrative shame on the part of the offender, accompanied by group support. In this paper, I argue that reintegrative shaming as practiced in family group conferencing in the youth justice (juvenile justice) context is based on a theory of “strong ties” associated with the extended families of Gemeinschaft societies. This important emphasis on the family/extended family unit as an affective focus, however, may have inadvertently diverted attention from the importance in Gessellschaft societies of “weak ties.” In modernity, such ties provide instrumental support that leads to connections that link offenders and victims to broader “bridging” relationships associated with social and human capital. This paper briefly considers two ostensibly “weak” restorative practices that effectively engage these broader connections for young offenders and families that may be fundamental to reintegration and other prosocial outcomes, while also mobilizing and strengthening the parochial controls and social support of neighbors and other adults. Ultimately, the sustainability of restorative justice will require an openness to practices that accomplish restorative goals, while also facilitating a more flexible, problem solving, and community-building focus.
97. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Howard Zehr The Intersection of Restorative Justice with Trauma Healing, Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding
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Although it originated in criminal justice, restorative justice is essentially a peacebuilding or conflict transformation approach to justice. The crossdisciplinary experience at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding has suggested some important lessons for restorative justice, peacebuilding and related fields. These include the role of trauma and victimization in justice and peacebuilding; the significance of justice questions in trauma and conflict resolution; the importance of addressing responsibilities as well as needs; the role of shame, storytelling and empathy; the commonality of underlying values; the need for our fields to address underlying issues of bias and structure; and the susceptibility of our fields to unintended consequences. Restorative justice suggests some questions and issues that may be of use to peacebuilding practitioners in general. Above all, it is important for all of us to see ourselves within a larger umbrella of peacebuilding; this will require that we move from competition to collaboration and adopt a common vision of "justpeace."
98. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Tom Cavanagh Creating a New Discourse of Peace in Schools: Restorative Justice in Education
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Creating a new discourse of peace in schools offers educators a choice in how they think, believe, and act in response to student wrongdoing and conflict. In this article the reader is introduced to how restorative justice principles can be used in education as a way of supporting a school-wide culture of care, where building and maintaining healthy relationships are fundamental principles. Thisnew discourse offers an alternative to the traditional discipline practices in schools, which focus on rules and consequences. The literature, research and major findings underlying this new discourse are explained. Finally, circles are described as an application of this new discourse.
99. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Laura Mirsky Restorative Justice Practices of Native American Practitioners of the Southwestern United States
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This article about restorative justice practices of Native American Restorative Justice of the southwestern United States is not intended to be all-inclusive, but rather a broad thematic overview. It includes interviews with three justice practitioners of the southwestern United States: The Honorable Robert Yazzie, chief justice emeritus of the Navajo Nation Supreme Court and director of the Dine’é Policy Institute of the Dine’é College at Tsaile, Arizona, a college chartered by the Navajo Nation; Judge Joseph Flies-Away of the Hualapai Nation; and James Zion, formerly solicitor to the Navajo Nation Courts, currently domestic abuse commissioner at Crownpoint, New Mexico, Family Court.
100. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Terry O’Connell The Origins of Restorative Conferencing
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Terry O’Connell helped pioneer restorative justice in Australia, the United Kingdom and North America. A 30-year police veteran, he worked with the Thames Valley Police service developing restorative practices in the UK, including its use in police agency complaints and discipline systems. O’Connell is responsible for the creation of the Real Justice conference script, a Socratic approach that focuses on asking restorative questions. O’Connell realized that letting people talk about how they were affected by the actions of others wasmore effective than blaming and punishing offenders. As director of Real Justice Australia, an IIRP program, he has expanded this model to a range of family, community, institutional and workplace settings. In schools in particular, restorative practices has been a catalyst for change, helping teachers, students and parents strengthen relationships, improve school culture and reduce discipline problems.