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81. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Christy Mag Uidhir Getting Emotional Over Contours: A Response to Seeley
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In the previous paper, Bill Seeley suggests that what follows from research into crossmodal perception for expression and emotion in the arts is that there is an emotional contour (i.e., a contour constitutive of the content of an emotion and potentially realizable across a range of media). As a response of sorts, I speculate as to what this might hold for philosophical and empirical enquiry into expression and emotion across the arts as well as into the nature of the emotions themselves.
82. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Luis Rocha Antunes The Vestibular in Film: Orientation and Balance in Gus Van Sant’s Cinema of Walking
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For decades, the audiovisual nature of the film medium has limited film scholarship to the strict consideration of sound and sight as the senses at play. Aware of the limitations of this sense-to-sense correspondence, Laura U. Marks has been the first to consistently give expression to a new and emergent line of enquiry that seeks to understand the multisensory nature of film.Adding to the emergent awareness of the cinema of the senses, neuroscience, specifically multisensory studies, has identified autonomous sensory systems beyond the classic five senses: the vestibular (orientation and balance), proprioception (posture and body position), pain, and temperature perception. This essay investigates the principles of the multisensory film experience when applied to our sense of orientation and balance in film – the vestibular in film. Here I seek to outline the neural and physiological evidence supporting the idea that we can have access to the multisensory exclusively through sound and image, based on the nature of our perception and cognition.I then apply this frame of reference to a new understanding of Gus Van Sant’s cinema of walking composed by the so-called death trilogy of Gerry (2002), Elephant (2003) and Last Days (2005) plus Paranoid Park (2007). With this analysis I show how the vestibular sense can be a powerful aesthetic and cinematic mode of filmmaking, as well revealing of the sensuous nature of film.
83. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Jim Blackmon Review of Re-Emergence: Locating Conscious Properties in a Material World, by Gerald Vision
84. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Peter H. Denton Review of The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves, by W. Brian Arthur
85. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Alex Sager Review of Eyes of the People: Democracy in an Age of Spectatorship, by Jeffery Edward Green
86. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Eric Rovie Review of Rethinking The Good: Moral Ideals and the Nature of Practical Reasoning, by Larry Temkin
87. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Eric Dietrich Review of The Death of Philosophy: Reference and Self-Reference in Contemporary Thought, by Isabelle Thomas-Fogiel, trans. Richard A. Lynch
88. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Qin Zhu Review of A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, by Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen, Stig Andur Pendersen, & Vincent F. Hendricks
89. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Jonathan Fuqua Review of Natural Signs and Knowledge of God: A New Look at Theistic Arguments, by C. Stephen Evans
90. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Greg L. Lowhorn Review of Intentionality and Semiotics: A Story of Mutual Fecundation, by John Deely
91. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Matthew McKeon Review of The Tarskian Turn: Deflationism and Axiomatic Truth, by Leon Horsten
92. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Maximiliano E. Korstanje Review of Ferry Tales: Mobility, Place and Time on Canada’s West Coast, by Phillip Vannini
93. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Maximiliano E. Korstanje Review of A diez años del 11 de Septiembre: Como cambió el mundo (9/11 Ten years ago: how the World changed), by Noam Chomsky
94. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Colin Patrick Review of Life and Action, by Michael Thompson
95. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Steven Ross Review of Debating the Ethics of Immigration: Is There A Right To Exclude?, by Christopher Heath Wellman and Phillip Cole
96. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Jon Erling Litland On Some Counterexamples to the Transitivity of Grounding
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I discuss three recent counterexamples to the transitivity of grounding due to Jonathan Schaffer. I argue that the counterexamples don’t work and draw some conclusions about the relationship between grounding and explanation.
97. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Paul Hovda, Troy Cross Grounding Relation(s): Introduction
98. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Louis deRosset What is Weak Ground?
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Kit Fine, in "The Pure Logic of Ground", has made a seminal attempt at formalizing the notion of ground. Fine ties the formal treatment of grounding to the notion of a weak ground. Formalization of this sort is supposed to bring clarity and precision to our theorizing. Unfortunately, as I will argue, it's not clear what weak ground is. I review five alternative explanations of the idea, and argue that none of them are ultimately satisfactory. I close by outlining a more complicated explanation of the notion that turns out to be more satisfactory.
99. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Avram Hiller Object-Dependence
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There has been much work on ontological dependence in recent literature. However, relatively little of it has been dedicated to the ways in which individual physical objects may depend on other distinct, nonoverlapping objects. This paper gives several examples of such object-dependence and distinguishes between different types of it. The paper also introduces and refines the notion of an n-tet. N-tets (typically) occur when there are object-dependence relations between n objects. I claim that the identity (or, rather, what I call the ndentity) conditions for n-tets are not grounded in the individual identity conditions of each of the n objects, but instead are metaphysically basic. The paper then briefly discusses some ramifications of accepting object-dependence (and n-tets) on the philosophy of biology, ethics, and logic.
100. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Donald Abel Review of Human Nature, ed. Constantine Sandis and M.J. Cain