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81. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Steven J. Brust Introduction
82. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Daniel Mahoney Christianity, Democracy, Socialism: Tocqueville’s Defense of a Limited Public Charity in Politics
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This article analyzes Alexis de Tocqueville’s eloquent and noble 1848 “Speech on the Right to Work.” The speech provides Tocqueville’s most powerful and sustained critique of socialism. Socialism is taken to task for its “energetic, continuous , immoderate appeal to the material passions of men,” for its “continuous” attack on the “very principles of private property,” and for its scorn for individual reason and initiative. Tocqueville argues that democracy and socialism are at their heart “contradictory things.” But at the same time, Tocqueville affirms a Christian and democratic obligation for government to provide “public charity” for the poor. For all his concerns about tutelary despotism and the socialist subversion of democracy, he did not oppose the welfare state per se, at least in a modest form. The article shows that Tocqueville’s “Christian democratic” vision provides a principled, humane, and morally serious alternative to both libertarianism and collectivism.
83. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
David M. Klocek In Memoriam: Thomas P. Melady (1927-2014)
84. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Stephen Sharkey Robert R. Reilly, Making Gay OK: How Rationalizing Homosexual Behavior Is Changing Everything
85. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
D. Brian Scarnecchia Response to a Call for Papers from the World Health Organization
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This document, drafted by SCSS Treasurer and UN Non-Governmental Organization Representative D. Brian Scarnecchia, was submitted on behalf of the SCSS and a sister Catholic NGO in response to a request for papers concerning recommendations to improve maternal health and reduce child mortality as part of the UN’s Millennium Development Goals.
86. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Stephen M. Krason In Memoriam: Rupert J. Ederer (1923-2013)
87. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Stephen M. Krason On Our Dysfunctional Criminal Justice System
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This was one of SCSS president and Franciscan University of Steubenville professor Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left Nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared initially in Crisismagazine.com on May 1, 2013. It argues why the U.S. criminal justice system is in a state of crisis. It argues that what seem to be ideologically-oriented critiques of the problems of the system actually have their basis in traditional Christian thinking.
88. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Society of Catholic Social Scientists 21st Annual National Meeting-Conference: Franciscan University of Steubenville, October 25-26, 2013
89. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Mark Gonnella Authentic Sexual Freedom: John Paul II’s Personalism as a Response to Humanistic Psychology
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The inadequacy of secular humanistic understandings of human sexuality has been demonstrated in the contemporary dissatisfaction with the superficiality of sexual activity and romantic relationships. The limitations of the secular psychology that gave rise to the debased contemporary view of sexuality—exemplified in the work of Carl Rogers—can be overcome by applying the fuller personalist anthropology of Pope John Paul II. This application is made by examining the topics of man’s relationship with God, subjectivity versus subjectivism, the source and character of morality, the nature of freedom, and the nature of marriage.
90. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Edward J. O'Boyle Freedom of Economic Initiative, Intermediary Groups, and a Personalist Economy
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This article is concerned with four questions. How are decisions made in economic affairs? What role does freedom play in a market economy? How important is freedom in a market economy? How best to preserve freedom of economic initiative? Based on responses to those questions, we argue that a personalist economy with its reliance on intermediary groups and preservation of economic freedom represents an alternative to the individualism of capitalism and the collectivism of socialism. The evidence presented breaks the stereotype of private group decision-making as collusive and demonstrates that a personalist economy is a functioning reality in the United States.
91. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
About the Authors
92. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Christopher White Gilbert Meilaender, Bioethics: A Primer for Christians (3rd ed.), and Elio Sgreccia, Personalist Bioethics: Foundations and Applications
93. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Adam Seagrave Response to Daniel Mahoney: Is Tocqueville’s “Middle Way” Adequate?
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This response to Daniel Mahoney’s symposium paper raises the question of whether Tocqueville’s “middle way” between libertarianism and socialism is ultimately tenable, due to the tendency of people under democratic regimes to pursue equality more passionately than they defend liberty.
94. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Jeffrey S. Burwell, S.J. An Educational Crisis in the Land of Jesus: Unprecedented Challenges Facing Catholic Schools in East Jerusalem and the West Bank
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The New Evangelization presumes that Catholic schools play a valuable role in spreading the gospel and transmitting the faith. For the first time in their collective history, demographic changes have nevertheless made it difficult for Catholic schools in East Jerusalem and the West Bank to do this. Using a mixed-method study with data obtained from fourteen institutions, this study determined that the mandate of these schools is affected by challenges related to their Catholic identity and financial stability. With limited resources at their disposal, administrators of these institutions are in a precarious situation. Without strong leadership and support from the international community, the future of Catholic education in the region is uncertain.
95. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Gary J. Scott Is There a Moral School of Economics?: The Profundity and Practicality of Benedict XVI's Economic Logos
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Pope Benedict XVI’s social encyclical Caritas in Veritate offers insight into the relationship between theology and economics, between moral principles and economic policy. This article highlights potential obstacles to the reception of the emeritus pope’s arguments, identifies the encyclical’s principal lesson in one key sentence, and argues that there are compelling reasons for scholars and policymakers to consider and even appropriate Benedict’s substantial teaching on the enduring social question.
96. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Bishop William Murphy The Diversity of Sanctity and the Unity of Holiness: Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II
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Originally delivered as a lecture at the Center for Catholic Studies, Nassau Community College, New York, October 5, 2013, this address outlines the ways in which the lives of Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II exemplify the following principle: although union with God in Christ (holiness) is the common aim of Christians, there are many paths to achieve this within the context of every individual life (sanctity). The address anticipated the canonization of John and John Paul on April 27, 2014.
97. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Mark Lowery Philip A. Rolnick, Person, Grace, and God, in the series Sacra Doctrina: Christian Theology for a Postmodern Age
98. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
S. M. Wesley Charles Camosy, For Love of Animals: Christian Ethics, Consistent Action
99. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
Brian Scarnecchia Monica Migliorino Miller, Abandoned: The Untold Story of the Abortion Wars
100. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 19
John Hart The American Medical Association: Former Defender of Unborn Babies
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At one time, the American Medical Association (AMA) had a strong pro-life position regarding unborn human beings. Using an online AMA archives database, this research note contrasts early AMA pro-life commentary with its eventual pro-choice position. Strong pro-life advocacy in the mid-to-late 1800s, led by doctors such as Horatio Storer, gave way in the 1900s to a waning of pro-life zeal, and eventually developed into a pro-choice stance on abortion.