Displaying: 81-100 of 234 documents

0.122 sec

81. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
C. Michael Shea, Robert J. Porwoll Newman's Theses de Fide: A New Edition, Translation, and Commentary
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
John Henry Newman wrote the “Theses de Fide” in Rome as a seminary student in 1846/1847, and the text represents a key point in the development of his thought. Newman wrote the “Theses” in an attempt to grapple with scholastic categories on faith, a question that had occupied him in the Anglican Church for years. Although the “Theses” were not published in Newman’s life, he returned to these reflections often over the course of his Roman Catholic career. This edition and partial translation of the “Theses de Fide” is to aid general readers in understanding this moment in Newman’s life, and to assist specialists in approaching the manuscript record of the “Theses” themselves.
82. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Andreas Koritensky The Early John Henry Newman on Faith and Reason
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The catholic reception of John Henry Newman’s work is traditionally focused on his late writings, though Newman developed almost his entire philosophical and theological program during his Anglican years. Especially his Oxford University Sermons provide an epistemology that challenged the current rationalist interpretation of faith. In his analysis of ethical sagacity, Aristotle’s point of departure is the spoudaios, a person with well-formed character. Newman adapted this perspective for his investigation of the concept of faith. It drew his attention to the relation of reason and affections. And it made him aware of the role of informal reasoning, the Aristotelian phronesis, which Newman combined with John Locke’s epistemology into a broader, humanistic concept of rationality.
83. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Newman Chronology
84. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
NINS Update
85. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Chuck Talar Newman In France During The Modernist Period: Pierre Batiffol and Marcel Hébert
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Although Newman felt that the conferral of the cardinalate lifted the cloud of suspicion forever, soon after his death his reputation came under another cloud: Modernism. This essay shows how Modernist concerns about the philosophical grounding of faith, Biblical interpretation, and the nature of dogmatic statements as presented by Pierre Batiffol and Marcel Hébert counter-pointed Newman’s idea of the development of doctrine.
86. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Michael Hickson A Cardinal Performance
87. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Edward Short A Better Country: Newman’s Idea of Public Life
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Although Newman is often considered a philosopher and theologian, a litterateur and historian, this article shows that his interest in the public affairs of his day and his political views, which were under-girded by his religious convictions, are found in his letters and diaries, in his essays, and even in his sermons.
88. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Rosario Athié “My Dear Miss Giberne”: Newman’s Correspondence with a Friend: 1826-1840
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
During the course of his long life, John Henry Newman made many friends—among them people to whom he was extremely devoted for decades. Maria Rosina Giberne was a family friend, whose friendship with Newman continued for over half a century. The present article looks at the development of this friendship as revealed in Newman’s correspondence for a decade and a half.
89. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Robert Barron John Henry Newman among the Postmoderns
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article, which was originally presented at the annual conference of the Venerable John Henry Newman Association in Mundelein, Illinois, in August 2004, portrays Newman as anticipating three aspects of postmodernism:the question of epistemological foundations, the role of theology in the academy, and a conversational model of truth.
90. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Avery Cardinal Dulles Newman and the Hierarchy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The present article, which was originally the keynote presentation on August 12, 2004, at the annual conference of the Venerable John Henry Newman Association at Mundelein, Illinois, traces the stages of Newman’s view of the hierarchy from the time of his involvement in the Oxford Movement to his post-conciliar reflections about the teaching of the First Vatican Council.Newman’s theology of the hierarchy, which cannot be understood apart from the controversies which engaged him, is, from a present-day perspective, both “stimulating and problematic.”
91. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford “John Henry Newman Belongs to Every Time and Place and People.”
92. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Newman Bibliography
93. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Joseph Linck The “Convert of Oxford” and the “Socrates of Rome”: John Henry Newman, Philip Neri, and the Oratory
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Why did Newman decide to become an Oratorian? This article examines the life and vision of St. Philip Neri (1515-1595), the founder of the Oratory, in relation to the apostolic ministry that John Henry Newman and his fellow Oxford-converts hoped to exercise in the Roman Catholic Church. This article concludes with reflections about the Oratory’s role, present and future.
94. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Newman Chronology
95. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Drew Morgan Awakening The Dream of Gerontius
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The publication of his Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864) brought Newman back into contact with many of his Anglican friends—two of whom gifted him with a violin. In his letter of appreciation, Newman mused: “Perhaps thought is music.” Such would seem to be the case with his poem, The Dream of Gerontius (1865), which was set to music by Sir Edward Elgar (1900). This essay explores the relationship between Newman’s Apologia and The Dream of Gerontius and then analyzes the latter’s structure and content and compares it with other Christian classics.
96. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Mary Katherine Tillman Mary in the Writings of John Henry Newman
97. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
NINS Update
98. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Rosario Athié Faith and Doubt: Newman’s Example of Friendship
99. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
John T. Ford John Henry Newman as Contextual Theologian
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
What is the reason for the continued interest in Newman’s theology? This article’s reply that Newman was a contextual theologian is based on a consideration of three questions:Was Newman a theologian? What was the context of his theology? What are the reasons for Newman’s theological longevity?
100. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography