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81. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography
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82. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Peter M. J. Stravinskas Newman the Failure
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The Venerable John Henry Cardinal Newman seemingly had the “Midas touch” in reverse. Oxford, Littlemore, Dublin were all sites of failures; the “Achilli Affair” was a humiliation; the quarrel with Faber was an embarrassment. Nonetheless, most people today think of Newman as a rousing success story. Why? Newman serves as an object lesson in living the Paschal Mystery, whereby each moment of crisis can be transformed into a moment of grace.
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83. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Robert C. Christie The Clash of Evangelical Doctrine with Parish Experience: The Overlooked Catalyst to Newman’s “Great Change of Religious Opinions” in 1824-25
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The following article focuses on ten “case histories” from Newman’s first months in pastoral ministry as an Anglican deacon. Cumulatively, these case histories show the interaction between his pastoral ministry, his life-experiences, and his theological development.
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84. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Bernadette Waterman Ward Awakened from My Dream: Newman on Illness and Spiritual Growth
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Most people do their utmost to avoid any and every type of suffering; yet, as this experience-based article shows, Newman, early in life, came to realize from his own illnesses that physical suffering can bring the sufferer to an awareness of the presence of God and so be an important part of personal spiritual development.
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85. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
NINS Update
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86. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Stephen Kelly A History of John Henry Newman's Archival Papers
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This study traces the history of Newman’s personal papers that are archived at the Birmingham Oratory. Newman was the “master archivist” who spent considerable time during the last two decades of his life in assembling his papers. Subsequently, three major catalogues of Newman’s papers were prepared: the first began in 1920, under the supervision of Richard Garnett Bellasis and Henry Lewis Bellasis; a second catalogue was compiled in the mid-1950s by Yale University Library for microfilming Newman’s papers; the third catalogue was compiled by Gerard Tracey in 1980.
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87. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Geertjan Zuijdwegt Richard Whately’s Influence On John Henry Newman’s Oxford University Sermons On Faith And Reason (1839–1840)
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In 1839 and 1840, Newman preached four Oxford University Sermons, which critiqued the evidential apologetics advocated by John Locke (1632-1704) and William Paley (1743-1805) and subsequently restated by Richard Whately (1787-1863). In response, Newman drew upon Whately’s earlier works on logic and rhetoric to develop an alternative account of the reasonableness of religious belief that was based on implicit reasoning from antecedent probabilities. Newman’s argument was a creative response to Whately’s contention that evidential reasoning is the only safeguard against superstition and infidelity.
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88. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
C. Michael Shea The “French Newman”: Louis Bautain’s Philosophy of Faith, Reason, and Development and the Thought of John Henry Newman
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Louis Bautain (1796–1867) has been described as the “French Newman” because of the resemblances between their lives and writings. This essay compares three aspects of the thought of Newman and Bautain: their respective understanding of faith, reason, and development. Both thinkers understood faith and reason in relation to conversion and the realities of life and viewed faith and reason as functioning in tandem with doctrinal development.
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89. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Brendan Case “Notions” and “Things” in John Henry Newman’s Grammar of Assent
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In discussing apprehension, assent, and inference in his Grammar of Assent, Newman contrasted “notions” and “things”—terms that distinguish knowledge of the abstract and “unreal” from knowledge of the singular and concrete. This essay proposes that Newman’s contrast between “notions” and “things” is an adverbial distinction, qualifying a person’s mode of engagement with the world, rather than an adjectival distinction, qualifying the metaphysical status of particular terms.
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90. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward Jeremy Miller The Church "Superintends" The University "What, Then, Does Dr. Newman Mean"?
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This word study, prompted by Newman’s statement that the church “superintends” the university, indicates that Newman, both as an Anglican and as a Roman Catholic, used “superintend” and its cognates in a variety of contexts: educational and ecclesiastical, theological and epistemological, as well as personal and parental.
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91. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford Johh Henry Newman: Conversion as Inference
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This essay examines the complementarity between Newman’s Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864), which provided an autobiographical account of his conversions, and his Grammar of Assent (1870), which described three types of inference—formal, natural, informal—that provide three paradigms for different types of religious conversion.
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92. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
M. Katherine Tillman John Henry Newman: Worldly Wisdom and Holy Wisdom
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After considering the meaning of “wisdom” in the Hellenic and Semitic Traditions, this essay examines Newman’s views about “worldly wisdom” in both a practical and a philosophical sense and then considers “holy wisdom” as contemplative and transcendent.
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93. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Greg Peters John Henry Newman’s Theology of the Monastic/Religious Life as a Means to Holiness
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By the late 1830s, John Henry Newman and Edward Bouverie Pusey were discussing the re-introduction of monastic/religious life into the Church of England. Though Newman did not remain in the Church of England long enough to see the full flowering of this effort, his writings as an Anglican theologian reveal that he viewed the monastic/religious life as a central way in which a person could grow in holiness and also a means of fostering the holiness of the Church as a whole.
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94. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Attilio Rossi A Sermon of John Henry Newman at St. Clement’s: “On the Nature of the Future Promise”
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This study considers Newman’s sermon—“On the Nature of the Future Promise”—which he preached on 4 September 1825 at St. Clement’s Church, Oxford—likely with his mother and sisters present in the congregation; in addition to treating Newman’s style of preaching and Evangelical theology, this sermon’s theological and pastoral dimensions are also examined.
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95. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Michael T. Wimsatt John Henry Newman’s View of Poetry
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After considering the life-long influence of poetry on Newman and his critical analysis of poetry, this study examines his poetic output during his Mediterranean voyage (1832–1833) and concludes by considering both the spiritual implications and the literary observations of his famous poem “The Pillar of the Cloud.”
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96. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
James J. Crile Johh Henry Newman’s The Arians of the Fourth Century: An Embarrassment?
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In spite of various criticisms, both at the time of its publication and more recently, Newman’s The Arians of the Fourth Century can be recommended—indeed it offers a valuable critique of modern historical scholarship on Arianism.
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97. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Lucas Laborde “Continuity of Principles” in John Henry Newman’s An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine
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Although Newman’s Essay on Development has been studied both in itself and as a milestone in his spiritual journey, scant attention has been given to a detailed analysis of his “notes” for doctrinal development. The following study examines the second note of development—“continuity of principles”—in order to ascertain both Newman’s understanding of “principles” and the way these principles can have continuity.
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98. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
David P. Long John Henry Newman and the Consultation of the Faithful
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This essay examines the strengths and weakness of Newman’s argument in “On Consulting the Faithful in Matters of Doctrine” that the lay faithful throughout history are the guarantors of orthodox doctrine by examining Newman’s understanding of the lay faithful, the sensus and consensus fidelium, and his historiographical methodology.
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99. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Keith Beaumont Newman’s Reflections on Biblical Inspiration
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Newman was keenly aware of the challenge posed to Christians by the development of historical biblical criticism in the nineteenth century. In several of his Anglican writings—most notably in no. 85 of Tracts for the Times, in unpublished notes and drafts dating from 1861–1863, and in two essays published in 1884—he attempted to resolve questions regarding the nature of biblical “inspiration,” the respective roles of the divine and human “authors,” and the nature of biblical “truth.” This article, originally a paper given at the 2012 conference of the Association française des Amis de Newman on Newman et la Bible, was first published in French in Études Newmaniennes no. 29 (2013).
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100. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Christopher Cimorelli The Possible Advantage of Doctrinal Growth: Revisiting Newman’s Understanding of Development
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In this article, I investigate Newman’s understanding of doctrinal development, specifically regarding the accumulation of doctrines over time. Through an analysis of Newman’s essay on development and a letter written by him in 1868, we can better understand the potential “advantage,” but not superiority, that comes from the everincreasing resources of tradition. Newman’s view of development is directed toward the present and abiding concern to maintain fidelity to the deposit of faith, or to what he understands to be a “sacred philosophy.”
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