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81. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Terrence W. Haverluk Explore Everything: Place Hacking the City. By Bradley L. Garrett
82. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Melissa Ley-Cervantes Home
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The “universally affective power of home” is such, that in the light of an increasingly mobile world this very concept articulates a great part of the contemporary debate around place, identity and belonging. An overview of such debate will be provided in this article. It begins with a problematization of the concept of home that allows us to understand it beyond notions of fixity and stability. The core of the article is a discussion about the ways in which contending definitions ofplace determine the understanding of attachments to place, and this will be grounded through the discussion of a particular way of experiencing such attachments: the feelings of home.
83. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Kishwar Habib, Hilde Heynen, Bruno De Meulder (Un)Covering the Face of Dhaka: Gender Politics and Public Space in the Post-Colonial City
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Socio-spatial conditions for women in Dhaka are very specific and highly contradictory. This article traces some of these contradictions by looking at the multilayered presence of women in public space—where public space is defined as both the space of politics and public discourse, and the physical space of streets, parks and squares. By analyzing the presence of women in public space, it is argued that one can observe a continuous tension within these spaces between ‘official’ discourses and often repeated ideas that stress equal rights for women on the one hand and a whole series of everyday practices on the other that rather tend to make women’s presence in public space marginal.
84. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Jeffrey B. Webb Pennsylvania’s Promotional Literature and the Cultivation of Quaker Civility in the Early Modern Atlantic World
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Between 1681-1725, several Quaker writers promoted settlement in Pennsylvania to English and continental readers. This promotional literature attempted to persuade investors to support the venture, and to attract potential emigres to settle in the province. These texts described the landscape as having been improved by Quakers through clearing the land, laying out farms and towns, and refining the built environment. This widely circulated image of an improved landscape joined with other writings to refute the charge that Quaker incivility disqualified Friends for government during a volatile era of English politics. Pennsylvania’s improvement gave weight to the claims of William Penn and others that Friends deserved not only religious toleration in England but political authority as well, in the American provinces and throughout the Atlantic World.
85. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Cyrus Shahan Hope and Suspicion: Alexander Kluge, Peter Sloterdijk, and the Non-Existent Home
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This essay theorizes a spatial-affective strategy from the discursive silence between Alexander Kluge and Peter Sloterdijk. Using as a springboard their discussion of a film that Sergei Eisenstein never made, I identify two possibilities of agency in an age of late globalization: Kluge’s faith in the possibility of liberating processes and spaces and Sloterdijk’s mistrust in the hegemonic structures of contemporary society. The difference between those agentive-affective possibilities gives rise to distinct strategies for a subjective geography capable of countering the violent and virtual spaces of late globalization. Rather than declaring one philosopher’s strategy the path to luck, this essay tests how each can be mobilized. Thereby, the crucial location of humans in spaces normallyconstrained by capitalism’s rhetoric of terror and safety can instead become—though hope or suspicion—spaces engendering more plural subjects.
86. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Daryn Reyman-Lock The Triumphal Arches of Gallia Narbonensis: Iconography, Boundary and Identity
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Often the term “Roman frontiers” is used to refer to the outer borders of the empire and, in some instances, the physical limes systems that demarcated the extent of Roman rule. However, it is also possible to discuss the frontiers of the internal provinces, some of which offered important strategic and political advantages to the Romans. Certainly, this is true of Gallia Narbonensis, an internal province that is modern-day Southern France and the Rhone Valley. Here, early Augustan urbanization schemes and imperial policy underlined the beneficial relationship between indigenous populations and the Roman military and aristocracy, resulting in urban and provincial landscapes that defined borders relevant to not only local urban populations, but also foreigners – Roman subjects and “barbarians” alike. One way to identify these ideological frontiers is through the examination of Narbonensian triumphal architecture, particularly arches.Triumphal arches are more prevalent in Gallia Narbonensis than in any other province in the Western Empire. During the early stages of imperial expansion, Augustus began new phase of triumphal iconography that took into account the differing secular ideologies of the frontier and interior. Where the aggressive and militaristic traditions of border tribes were used as a means to defend the Empire, the populations of the interior were demilitarized – an act which was called peace by the imperial government. The non-military virtue, in addition to urbanization, set those identified as Roman apart from those seen as barbarian.
87. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Linda McCarthy Detroit: An American Autopsy
88. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Alex Zukas Tierralismo: Stories from a Cooperative Farm
89. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Elizabeth Jelinek An Examination of Plato’s Chora
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In the Timaeus, Plato’s creation story, Plato describes an entity he refers to as the chora. The Greek word chora is translated as place, room, or space, but Plato’s descriptions of the chora are so notoriously enigmatic that there is disagreement about what, exactly, he intends to indicate by it. In this paper, I address an interpretation of the chora according to which the chora is a kind of cosmic mirror. I argue that this interpretation results in an uncharitable reading of Plato’s explanation. Alternatively, I contend that Plato conceives of the chora as space, place, and matter all at once. The upshot of my view is that it attributes to Plato a more nuanced understanding of space and place and a more coherent explanatory account.
90. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Annmarie Adams, Shelley Hornstein Can Architecture Remember? Demolition after Violence
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Th is paper uncovers how demolition has served as a collective way of forgetting violent pasts. It explores several examples in Canada, including the 1992 demolition of the notorious Mount Cashel Orphanage in St. John’s, Newfoundland, a building we claim was purposefully razed to the ground in order to forget egregious crimes of sexual abuse that had taken place on the site. We contend that as with other sites associated with difficult memories, this was a valiant effort to forget by removing all traces of the setting. We note that even when buildings are not demolished following violent events, echoes of their architectural forms are often recast in the forms of memorials, both real and virtual.
91. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Katrina Simon Re-casting the Past: Re-instating Once Broken and Tuneless Bells and the Recalling of Past Urban Landscapes
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Th is paper explores the perception of urban landscapes through sound, using two case studies of cities where bells played a significant role in the city, where a particular dramatic event silenced these bells, and where the act of remaking broken or tuneless bells re-creates an engagement with the lived places of the past. At Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, newly cast bells recreate the melodious peal last heard before the French Revolution, and ChristChurch Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand, bells damaged by destructive earthquakes of 2011 will eventually ring out their familiar tones in an urban landscape that is physically almost unrecognisable. Both case studies demonstrate the ways that the inadvertent and the deliberate transformation of soundscapes continually interactswith ideas of place and meaning within the constantly changing city.
92. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Matthew G. McKay Reflecting on Access to Common Property Coastal Resources via a Case Study along Connecticut’s Shoreline
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Public access to the commons is often restricted, thus leading to implicit regulations (in addition to explicit barriers that exclude who can and who cannot utilize the commons). This is relevant toward spatial systems, as an important geographical issue is access to various sites over space (Heatwole and West 1980), and this paper presents varying degrees of accessibility in different places (i.e., municipal and state jurisdictions in the United States, with a particular emphasis on Connecticut’s coastline). There is a dialectic struggle to enhance access to the commons as a fundamental right of the public, with the need to balance tourism and recreational uses of coastal resources with conservation and preservation eff orts. This paper will aid policy makers and those concerned with beach access in Connecticut (and beyond) better understand the nature and complexity of how citizens and officials within coastal municipalities have come to perceive, in a collective sense, their beaches/ municipal parks as common property resources to be utilized for recreational purposes while balancing environmental conservation efforts simultaneously. Various legal frameworks, as well as federal and state efforts in coastal zones in key states (including Connecticut), in addition to historically recent court cases in Connecticut resulting in legal enhancements toward increasing public access to nonresidents of specific municipalities, have shaped who can and who cannot access the commons.
93. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Natasha Lushetich Private Reconstructions of Past Collective Experiences: Technologies of Remembering-Forgetting
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This article queries the notion of performance as a sustained act of commemoration, and, thus, implicitly, atonement and forgetting. Laying aside potentialconsiderations of guilt and/or victimisation inherent in the spatio-temporal superimposition of a World War II modality of existence on an affluent, and, by comparison, peaceful part of the world, my investigation focuses on three mutually related areas of performance: the body’s hidden somaticity, the co-becoming of the self and time; and walking as a mnemonic mechanism. Aided by the Japanese philosophers’ Shigenori Nagatomo’s concept of the hidden body and Kitaro Nishida’s theorisation of the relationship between the temporalised and the atemporal, the actual and the virtual, the spatial and the non-spatial as the continuity of discontinuity, I argue against the idea of performance as a cumulative, sedimentary and implicitly restorative poiesispraxis. Instead, I seek to articulate the ways in which the actional, interoceptive and psychogeographic schemes generated by eating and walking intertwine to create complex patterns of individual-collectiveremembering-forgetting.
94. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Chuck Ward A Philosophy of Walking. By Frédéric Gros. Translated by John Howe
95. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
John Kaiser Ortiz Unruly Spaces: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies. By Alastair Bonnett
96. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Leah S. Glaser Rethinking Rural: Global Community and Economic Development in the Small Town West. By Don E. Albrecht
97. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Karl Benediktsson, Edda R.H. Waage Taskscapes at Sea: Trawler Fishing and the Experience of Fluid Nature
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Recent interest by scholars in the ocean and its complex geographies has not been directed much towards the everyday life of those on board fishing vessels and how they sense the nature around them. A large trawler for oceanic fishing is a highly efficient industrial production machine, carrying an array of equipment that mediates the connection between crew and nature. This article presents results from an experimental research project, where one of the authors joined a fishing trip on an Icelandic factory trawler. The resulting rich set of ethnographic material reveals much about the particularities of being at sea. It is argued that the ship can be understood as a series of distinct taskscapes, each of which affords certain relations between human and non-human nature.
98. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
M Jackson Representing Glaciers in Icelandic Art: A Spatial Shift
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Glaciers in Iceland are disappearing, and this article investigates how such glacier change might be transmitted into Icelandic culture, specifically, in art oriented around Icelandic glaciers. Utilizing cultural climatology as an approach, this article analyzes changes in spatial properties of glaciers as represented in older and newer artworks. Three central spatial characteristics of glaciers emerge and provide insights into how glacier loss can be represented and understood: 1) the compression of traditional distance; 2) the use of multiple perspectives; and 3) the structural representation of the glacier body. Analysis suggests a re-positioning of glaciers in the cultural imaginary and the fluctuating nature of how individuals and societies understand themselves and their place within the glaciated landscapes.
99. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
C. Patrick Heidkamp On Nordic Place-making: Introduction to the Themed Issue on Nordic Environments, Nordic Places, Nordic Spaces
100. Environment, Space, Place: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Alex Zukas Dreamland