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71. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Chris Marsden, Jörg Andriof Big Business and. Society: Part of the Problem and the Solution?
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A new role for business in society is emerging which goes beyond traditional philanthropy and local good neighborliness and extends to active engagement in wider societal issues and triple bottom line accountability. This paper offers new insights Into analyzing a company's approach to its wider role in society, in other words its corporate citizenship, it is based on the evidence of 12 companies, which participated in an action research conference held at Warwick University Business School In July 1998. It helps understanding of a company's current citizenship position, that of its benchmark peers and In which direction it might most easily be influenced to develop.
72. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Peter Dahler-Larsen What is society?
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If we are concerned with the relation between business and society, we cannot be careless about the specific meaning of the term society. A few ideas about the conceptualization of the term society are reviewed-based on three contemporary European sociologists: Castoriadis, Morin, and Luhmann.
73. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Nobuyuki Chikudate Corporate Social Performance as a Phenomenological Construct—Building Linguistic Bridges across Levels of Analysis
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This study discusses the utilization of applied Habermasian theories in the field of business and society. It focuses on Wood's (1991) CSP from the perspectives of Habermasian project of the structural transformation of the public sphere.
74. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Jeny M. Calton Reflexive Discourse as a Communicative Ethical Process: Toward A “Value Attunement” Model Of CSP?
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This symposium panel will draw upon some of the fascinating, occasionally vexing, insights of European critical theory to suggest alternative ways of thinkmg about, as well as enacting, one of the core constructs of our field—coiporate social performance. My paper will explore the integrative potential of reflexive discourse as a sense making process to approach “value attunement” within stakeholder communities.
75. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Sybille R. Sachs, Edwin Rühll, Ruth Schmitt, Daniel Peter Redefining the corporation - A case study on Shell, a multinational corporation
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Multinational corporations are increasingly subject to the public’s attention, as a result of changing societal expectations towards corporations in general and multinationals in particular. Especially global players like Shell are perceived not only as economic institutions but also as a societal ones. This paper contributes to the understanding of the corporation's changing function by analyzing the Shell case based on a framework developed by the authors. The Shell case is a part of the "Redefining the corporation" international research project supported by the Alfred P. SLOAN Foundation.
76. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Suzanne Beaulieu, Jean Pasquero Conceptualizing Legitimacy in a Professional Context
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To date, the literature on governance has not paid much attention to professional legitimacy, and less still to how professional organizations attempt to preserve their legitimacy. Legitimacy is, however, a fundamental requirement for ensuring the survival of these organizations. Taking the case of two accounting professions in Quebec, which are currently going through a period of turbulence, this paper examines management issues related to their continued quest for legitimacy, which is closely related to their specific identity and roles. The theoretical background is based on five prevalent theories (institutionalism, negotiated order, stakeholders, impression management and closure). Legitimacy is defined here in three dimensions with its management dynamic vatying with three modes.
77. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Jayne W. Barnard Corporate Criminal Liability: A Tool for Corporate Governance Reform
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The existence of the federal Sentencing Guidelines, and the power of the Justice Department to extract behavioral promises in exchange for a beneficial plea agreement, now make it possible for the criminal justice system to have a direct and significant impact on corporate governance practices. In feet, in several recent cases, government prosecutors have built into corporate plea agreements specific improvements in board composition and changes in management’s monitoring practices. These developments, in turn, have stimulated some prophylactic governance changes. The Justice Department should now consider further uses of its powers in this area. And both shareholders and other stakeholders should welcome the exercise of these powers.
78. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Brad Brown, Jeanne M. Logsdon Corporate Reputation and Organization Identity as Constructs for Business and Society Research
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Two constructs have been developing in strategic management and organization theory that relate to many topics in the business and society field - reputation and organization identity. These constructs have significant potential for contributing to research in business and society, and our field can likewise enrich work in these sister fields.
79. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Yaolung James Hsieh Corporate Philanthropy: Why and Why Not?
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This paper utilizes in-depth interviews and questionnaire survey to examine the motives of corporate philanthropy and reasons of not making corporate contributions among export-import firms in Taiwan. The results indicate that these Taiwanese firms, when making corporate contributions, emphasize social responsibility motive most, followed by top management’s influences and external solicitation. It appears that enhancing product sales, corporate image, and sales promotion or reducing pressure from competitors are not participant firms’ primary motives when making corporate contributions. With regards to reasons of not making, corporate contributions, the data reveal that lack of human resources is the primary cause that leads participant firms to make no corporate contributions, and followed by insufficient funds.This paper also develops scales for measuring motives of corporate philanthropy and reasons of not making corporate contributions. All of the scales measured have a greater than 0.5, indicating satisfactory reliability for these constructs (Churchill and Peter 1984). Also, factor analysis was performed to determine content validity of these constructs (Churchill 1979). The results (with varimax rotation) revealed approximate match between factors and conceptualized corporate philanthropic motive constructs, and perfect correspondence between factors and conceptualized “reasons of not making corporate contribution" constructs. This indicates high face validity of the measures.Managerial implications are provided as well as limitations of this study and suggestions for future research.
80. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 1999
Morten Huse, Harry J. Van Buren III, Cathrine Hansen A Pastor in the Firm?: A Study of Exiting Clergy
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In this paper aspects of “spiritual” management are explored in a study in which 70 exiting clergy were interviewed. The paper reports the results of this study conducted in Norway, and how it contributes to (1) understanding clergy in secular organizations, (2) exploring working conditions in local parishes, and(3) exploring what the church can learn form secular organizations.