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61. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
John Markham, M.D. Medicine
62. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Joseph Jilka Uses of Genetically Modified Foods
63. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Mark S. Latkovic, Timothy A. Nelson, M.D. Conjoined Twins of Malta: A Survey of Catholic Opinion
64. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Daniel P. Maher Parental Love and Prenatal Diagnosis
65. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
John Paul II Remarks to President Bush on Stem Cell Research
66. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
W. Malcolm Byrnes Human Genetic Technology, Eugenics, and Social Justice
67. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Colloquy
68. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
William F. Dietrich The Origin and Implications of the Human Genome Project
69. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
70. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Michael J. Miller Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case against Abortion Choice by Francis J. Beckwith
71. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Allison LeDoux Emergency Contraception: Can It Be Morally Justified?
72. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Robert Scott Smith, M.D., Bryan A. Piras, Carr J. Smith The Bioethics of Gene Therapy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Gene therapy is the modification of the human genetic code to prevent disease or cure illness. This technology is in its infancy and remains confined to experimental clinical trials. Once the present barriers are overcome, gene therapy will confront humanity with a host of ethical challenges. Therapies targeted to the genes of germ-line cells will introduce permanent changes to the human gene pool. Furthermore, nonmedical gene modifications have the potential to introduce a new form of eugenics into our society by which some members attempt to become inherently superior to others and humanity is re-engineered to man-made specifications. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 2010): 45–50.
73. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Books Received
74. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Richard M. Doerflinger Washington Insider
75. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward J. Furton Selective Citations
76. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Colloquy
77. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward J. Furton, M.A., Ph.D. In This Issue
78. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Philip Blosser Retrieving the Natural Law: A Return to Moral First Things by J. Daryl Charles
79. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Rev. Benedict M. Guevin, O.S.B. Reproductive Technologies in Light of Dignitas personae
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The purpose of the Instruction Dignitas personae, issued by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, is not only to reaffirm the validity of the teaching laid out in Donum vitae (1987), with regard to both the principles on which it is based and the moral evaluations which it expresses, but to add needed clarification on reproductive technologies in the light of more recent developments. In addition to the reproductive technologies discussed in Dignitas personae, namely, homologous and heterologous artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, the author also discusses other reproductive technologies, not covered by the Instruction, such as gamete intrafallopian transfer, zygote intrafallopian transfer, tubal embryo transfer, and pronuclear-stage embryo transfer. After analyzing each of these the author offers a general ethical evaluation. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 2010): 51–59.
80. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Vital Conflicts in Medical Ethics: A Virtue Approach to Craniotomy and Tubal Pregnancies by Martin Rhonheimer