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61. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 3
Guy L. Beck Nāda-Brahman and North Indian Classical Music: Parameters of Intersection
62. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 3
Purushottama Bilimoria A Misconception about the Nature of Self in Hindu Philosophy: A Critique of Śamkara's Strategy and Foundationalism
63. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 3
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Examination of the Argument from Inherent Ability
64. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 3
Steven W. Laycock Relativism and Alethic Emptiness: A Buddhist Response to Sartre
65. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 3
Mark Siderits Relativism, Objectivity and Comparative Philosophy: Seeing Parfit Through Buddhist Eyes
66. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 3
Ramakrishna Puligandla Creativity in Advaita-Vedānta
67. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 4
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Examination of the Argument from Immediate productivity
68. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 4
Barbara Mikolajewska Desire Came Upon that one in the Beginning...: Creation Hymns of the Rig Veda
69. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 4
J. Randall Groves India in Western Philosophy of History
70. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 4
Christopher Ross Reconciling Claims to Transcendence with Evidence of Cultural Relativity: Case Studies in Visiting Mother Meera
71. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 4
Leon Schlamm C. G. Jung's Ambivalent Relationship to the Hindu Religious Tradition: A Depth-Psychologist's Encounter with 'The Dreamlike World of India'
72. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Sukharanjan Saha The Thesis of Ninikalpaka in Nyaya and Vaisesiḳa
73. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Stephen Phillips Two Problems about Perception and Mental Intermediaries in the Nyāya Dualism: Focus and "Extraordinary" Sensory Connection with Perceived Properties
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A cognition is a psychological property distinct from the properties of a person's body and objects of sensory experience. A cognition rests or occurs in a self, and for only an instant before giving way to another cognition, each having as content, when veridical, intersubjective objects other than itself. But a cognition is also causally continuous with its objects—in the one direction, through the operation of the sense organs, sight, hearing, and so on, and, in the other, in having a causal role in action undertaken voluntarily. This paper sketches the Nyāya theory of perception with special attention to the arguments of the "New" or late Nyāya philosopher of the fourteenth century, Gangesa, in addressing two thorny areas of the Nyāya picture: (1) focus wanted and unwanted along with apparent cognitive simultaneity in a synthesis of sensory information deriving from the operation of more than one sense organ, and (2) the peculiar sensory connection involved in perception of future instances of universals, illusorty perception, and in recognition of someone or something that one has encountered before.
74. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Isaac Nevo Theories of Learning and Public Languages: Davidson's Program Reconsidered
75. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
J. Randall Groves Buddhism and Abortion
76. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: The Argument from Auxiliary Causal Conditions
77. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Carl Olson The Problematic and Liberating Nature of Language in the Philosophies of Derrida and Śaṅkara
78. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Gregory P. Fields Liberation as Healing in Classical Yoga
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Classical or Patañjala Yoga diagnoses die human conditon as state of suffering caused by ignorance whose specific form is misidentification of self with psychophysical nature. This paper argues that liberation in Yoga is healing in an ultimate sense, i.e., attainment of well-being with respect to the person's fundamental nature and soteriological potential. Vyāsa's Yogabhasya presents the yogic remedy in terms of a medical model, and this paper excavates the therapeutic paradigm of the Yogasūtras using concept of health distilled from the Āyurvedic medical text Caraka-saṁhitā. Determinants of health according to Āyurveda include wholeness, self-identit), and freedom, and these concepts are utilized to ground the claim that in classical Yoga, liberation is healing: curing the dysfunction and consequent suffering of one's psychophysical self, which is coextensive with realization of one's true Self as consciousness.
79. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Jai N. Misir Ralph Waldo Emerson: Kṛṣṇa Lays Upon Arjuna the Necessity of Fighting
80. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Peter Della Santina The Sākāra—Nirākāravāda Controversy