Displaying: 61-80 of 424 documents

0.12 sec

61. Symposium: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Ian Angus Galilean Science and the Technological Lifeworld: The Role of Husserl’s Crisis in Herbert Marcuse’s Thesis of One-Dimensionality
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This analysis of Herbert Marcuse’s appropriation of the argument concerning the “mathematization of nature” in Edmund Husserl’s Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology shows that Marcuse and Husserl both assume that the perception of real, concrete individuals in the lifeworld underlies formal scientific abstractions and that the critique of the latter requires a return to such qualitative perception. In contrast, I argue that no such return is possible and that real, concrete individuals are constituted by the relation between a given perception and its horizon. In this manner, Marcuse’s social critique can be combined with Husserl’s theoretical-perceptual one, making possible an ecological critique. L’analyse de l’appropriation que fait Herbert Marcuse de l’argument concernant la « mathématisation de la nature » dans la Crise des sciences europe ennes et la phénoménologie transcendantale de Husserl démontre que Marcuse et Husserl assument tous les deux que la perception des individus réels concrets dans le monde de la vie sous-tend les abstractions scientifiques formelles et que la critique de ces dernières nécessite un retour à la perception qualificative. J’avance au contraire qu’un tel retour n’est pas possible et que les individus réels concrets sont constitués par la relation entre une perception donnée et son horizon. Nous pouvons alors combiner la critique sociale de Marcuse avec la critique théorico-perceptuelle de Husserl pour en faire une critique égologique.
Bookmark and Share
62. Symposium: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Kathleen Hulley The Philosophy of Iris Marion Young: A Bibliography
Bookmark and Share
63. Symposium: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
David Mitchell Existentialism is not a Humanism: Nothingness and the Non-Humanist Philosophy of the Early Sartre
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article challenges the view, originating in Heidegger’s Letter on Humanism, according to which Sartre’s thought remains wedded to a substantial, “humanist,” conception of the subject. Beginning with an account of Heidegger’s critique in the Letter, I examine the idea that humanism posits the human as a mode of entity in the world, thus precluding an originary enquiry into its nature. Next, I show how Heidegger is wrong to attribute such a view to Sartre. Turning to The Transcendence of the Ego, we see how Sartrean phenomenology reveals human beings as essentially worldly. Further, this engagement with Sartre allows us to see how we can reject humanism while maintaining a distinct meaning for the human. Specifically, interpreting Being and Nothingness makes clear how, when the human is conceptualized as the modification of world that is nothingness, it can have a distinctive being without existing as humanism’s subject-entity. Cet article met à l’épreuve l’idée qui prend son origine dans la Lettre sur l’humanisme de Heidegger selon laquelle la pensée de Sartre demeure attachée à une conception substantielle, « humaniste », du sujet. En commençant par un examen de la critique hei-deggérienne dans la Lettre, je considère l’idée qui veut que l’humanisme pose l’être humain comme un mode d’étant dans le monde et rende ainsi impossible un questionnement de sa nature. Ensuite, je montre comment Heidegger a tort d’attribuer une telle perspective à Sartre. Si l’on se tourne vers La transcendance de l’ego, on voit que la phénoménologie sartrienne révèle l’être hu-main comme essentiellement mondain. De plus, cet engagement avec la pensée sartrienne nous permet de voir comment on peut re-jeter l’humanisme tout en maintenant un sens distinct pour l’être humain. Plus spécifiquement, une relecture de L’E tre et le ne ant clarifie comment une conceptualisation de l’être humain comme la modification du monde qu’est le néant permet d’attribuer à l’être humain un être distinct sans pour autant en faire l’étant-sujet de l’humanisme.
Bookmark and Share
64. Symposium: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Martina Ferrari An-Archic Past: Rethinking Negativity with Bergson
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Thanks to the revival in Bergson’s scholarship prompted by Gilles Deleuze’s Bergsonism, it is widely recognized that Bergsonism challenges the metaphysics of presence. Less attention, however, has been devoted to the status of negation or negativity in Bergson’s thought. Differently from Deleuze, I argue that Bergson’s claim that memory and perception, past and present, differ in kind does not call for the erasure of the negative but rather for the radical reconceptualization of negation in temporal terms. Thinking negation temporally allows Bergson to open the space for conceptualizing existence beyond presence, for developing an account of the paradoxical nature of the past. With an insight that anticipates Derrida’s thinking, Bergson tells us that the past is neither “there” nor “not-there,” neither a presence nor an absence. Grâce au regain d’intérêt pour Bergson qu’a suscité le livre de Gilles Deleuze, Le bergsonisme, il est maintenant largement reconnu que le bergsonisme met la métaphysique de la présence à l’épreuve. On a cependant moins porté attention au statut de la négation ou de la négativité dans la pensée de Bergson. Au contraire de Deleuze, je soutiens que l’affirmation de Bergson selon laquelle la mémoire et la perception, le passé et le présent, diffèrent en espèce n’amène pas un effacement du négatif mais plutôt une reconceptualisation radicale de la négation en termes temporels. En pensant la négation temporellement, Bergson peut ouvrir un espace pour conceptualiser l’existence au-delà de la présence et développer une explication de la nature paradoxale du passé. Anticipant la pensée de Derrida, Bergson nous montre que le passé est ni « présent » ni « non-présent », ni une présence ni une absence.
Bookmark and Share
65. Symposium: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Max Schaefer The Failure of Life: Michel Henry and the Ethics of Incompleteness
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article addresses the problematic relation between Michel Henry’s phenomenology of life and ethics. More specifically, it asks whether Henry’s account of the self’s transcendental birth in the immanent self-generation of life allows for a sense of individual responsibility. I begin by discussing Henry’s generation of the self and show how the historical essence of the self is structured according to the antinomy of affectivity. I then show how, for Henry, this history of life is full and yet incomplete. Accordingly, life is attracted to growth and this growth happens insofar as living beings proceed through a series of stages of despair. I develop these stages by looking at Henry’s analyses of anxiety, desire, and humility in relation to Kierkegaard. I argue that even though there is already an initial sense of responsibility at work in the earliest stirrings of anxiety, it is only in humility that the self comes to know who it truly is and how it ought to relate to others. Cet article se penche sur la relation problématique entre la phéno-ménologie de la vie et l’éthique de Michel Henry. Plus spécifiquement, nous nous demandons si l’explication de la naissance trans-cendantale du soi dans l’auto-génération immanente de la vie que propose Henry permet de rendre compte d’un sens de la responsabilité personnelle. Nous débutons avec une analyse de la génération du soi chez Henry et montrons comment l’essence historique du soi est structurée selon l’antinomie de l’affectivité. Nous montrons en-suite comment, pour Henry, cette histoire du soi est pleine bien qu’incomplète. En conséquence, la vie est attirée par la croissance, et cette croissance se produit dans la mesure où les êtres vivants passent à travers une série de stades du désespoir. Nous dévelop-pons ces divers stades en nous tournant vers les analyses que fait Henry de l’angoisse, du désir, et de l’humilité en relation avec Kierkegaard. Nous soutenons que même s’il y a déjà un sens initial de la responsabilité à l’oeuvre dans le premier éveil de l’angoisse, c’est seulement en atteignant le stade de l’humilité que le soi en vient à savoir qui il est vraiment et comment il doit se rapporter aux autres.
Bookmark and Share
66. Symposium: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Lambert Zuidervaart Surplus beyond the Subject: Truth in Adorno’s Critique of Husserl and Heidegger
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Theodor Adorno’s idea of truth derives in part from his critique of Husserlian phenomenology and Heideggerian ontology. This essay examines three passages from Zur Metakritik der Erkenntnistheorie and Negative Dialektik in which Adorno appears intent on wresting a viable conception of propositional truth from Husserl’s account of categorial intuition and Heidegger’s conception of Being. While agreeing with some of Adorno’s criticisms, I argue that he does not give an adequate account of how predication contributes to cognition. Consequently, he fails to offer the viable conception of propositional truth required for both his critique of Heidegger and his broader idea of truth.L’idée adornienne de la vérité dérive en partie de sa critique de la phénoménologie husserlienne et de l’ontologie heideggérienne. Cet essai examine trois passages de Zur Metakritik der Erkenntnistheorie et Negative Dialektik où Adorno paraît vouloir tirer une conception viable de la vérité propositionnelle de l’explication de l’intuition catégoriale de Husserl et de la conception de l’Être d’Heidegger. Quoiqu’en accord avec certaines des critiques qu’avance Adorno, je maintiens qu’il néglige la manière dont la prédication contribue à la cognition. Par conséquence, sa conception de la vérité propositionnelle n’est pas viable étant donné sa propre critique d’Heidegger ainsi que son idée générale de la vérité.
Bookmark and Share
67. Symposium: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
James Phillips The Eternal Return of the Same and the Missed Opportunity of Heidegger’s Nietzsche: Sacrificing the Perspectivism of Moods to the History of Being
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Heidegger’s reading of Nietzsche’s doctrine of the eternal return of the same exhibits the preoccupations and limitations of his middle and late periods. It situates Nietzsche in the grand narrative of the history of the misunderstanding of being that Heidegger was striving to map. Yet it thereby neglects the question of the primordiality and insuperability of mood that was a focus of Being and Time and The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics. It does not acknowledge the alternative ontological path pursued by Nietzsche’s engagement with a world and time grounded in joy. This article attempts to defend Nietzsche by means of an appeal to the early Heidegger.La lecture de Heidegger de la doctrine de l’éternel retour du même de Nietzsche montre les préoccupations et les limitations des périodes moyenne et tardive de celui-là. Elle situe Nietzsche dans le métarécit de l’histoire du malentendu quant à l’être, à la schématisation duquel Heidegger s’était engagé. Toutefois elle néglige parlà la question de la primordialité et de l’insurmontabilité de l’humeur (Stimmung) qui était l’un des problèmes centraux d’Être et Temps et des Concepts fondamentaux de la métaphysique. Elle ne reconnaît pas la voie ontologique alternative qu’avait poursuivie l’engagement de Nietzsche avec un monde et un temps fondés sur la joie. Cet article essayera de défendre Nietzsche par un appel au Heidegger de la première période.
Bookmark and Share
68. Symposium: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Bruce Baugh From Serial Impotence to Effective Negation: Sartre and Marcuse on the Conditions of Possibility of Revolution
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Marcuse and Sartre take up the problem of alienating otherness from a Marxist perspective, Marcuse in One-Dimensional Man and Sartre in his Critique of Dialectical Reason. For Sartre, the “series” is a social relation that places individuals in competition, mediated by the materialized result of past praxis. For Marcuse, the loss of agency results from the productive apparatus determining the needs and aspirations of individuals. The question is how to convert alienating negativity into a negation of the society that negates individuals. For Sartre, this “negation of the whole” can come only from a mortal threat facing all members of the serialized group. For Marcuse, it comes from the individual becoming aware of her alienation, especially through works of art. For both, revolt must be a historically constituted, collective “living contradiction.”Marcuse et Sartre abordent le problème de l’altérité aliénante à partir d’une perspective marxiste, Marcuse dans L’homme unidimensionnel et Sartre dans sa Critique de la raison dialectique. Pour ce dernier, la « série » est une relation sociale qui met les individus en compétition, médiatisée par le résultat matérialisé de la praxis passée. Pour Marcuse, la perte de pouvoir est causée par le dispositif de production qui régule les besoins et les aspirations des individus. La question est ainsi comment transformer la négativité aliénante en une négation de la société qui nie les individus : d’après Sartre, cette « négation du tout » ne peut venir que d’une menace mortelle subie par tous les membres du groupe sérialisé ; si l’on en croit Marcuse, elle vient plutôt du fait qu’un individu prenne conscience de son aliénation, notamment à travers l’oeuvre d’art. Pour les deux, la révolte doit être, dans tous les cas, une « contradiction vivante » collective et historiquement constituée.
Bookmark and Share
69. Symposium: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Rick Elmore Identity, Exchange, and Violence: The Importance of Marxism for Reconciling Adorno’s Metaphysics and Politics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper follows the question of violence as a guide to exploring the link between the metaphysical, social, and political in Adorno’s thought. More specifically, I argue that violence, in the form of the exclusion, domination, and fungibility of life, marks the shared space of the metaphysical, material, and ethical for Adorno. Hence, this project contests the longstanding Habermas-inspired notion that there is something unclear in the way in which Adorno’s metaphysical and methodological critiques connect to his social and political concerns—most specifically, his desire to address real suffering. In addition, this paper contributes to the growing interest in Adorno’s Marxism, showing that it is through his commitments to Marx that Adorno sees the real, material importance of his critique of metaphysics and ontology, as well as the possibility for resisting the forces of social domination.Cet article suit la question de la violence comme une guide pour explorer le lien entre la métaphysique, le social et le politique dans la pensée d’Adorno. Plus particulièrement, je soutiens que la violence, sous la forme de l’exclusion, la domination et la fongibilité de la vie, marque l’espace partagé de la métaphysique, du matériel et de l’éthique chez Adorno. Dès lors, ce projet remet en cause la notion de longue date inspirée par Habermas selon laquelle il y aurait quelque manque de clarté dans la manière dont les critiques métaphysiques et méthodologiques d’Adorno se relient avec ses soucis sociaux et politiques—plus spécifiquement son désir de s’occuper de la souffrance réelle. Par ailleurs, cette étude contribue à l’intérêt en plein essor au marxisme d’Adorno, montrant que c’est dans ses engagements avec Marx qu’Adorno voit l’importance réelle et matérielle de sa critique de la métaphysique et de l’ontologie, ainsi que la possibilité de résister aux forces de la domination sociale.
Bookmark and Share
70. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Karen Houle Abortion as the Work of Mourning
Bookmark and Share
71. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Antonio Calcagno, Diane Enns Introduction: A Tribute
Bookmark and Share
72. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
A Note on Peer Review
Bookmark and Share
73. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Leonard Lawlor This Is Not Sufficient: The Question of Animals in Derrida
Bookmark and Share
74. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Antonio Calcagno On the Rates of Differentiation: Derrida on Political Thinking
Bookmark and Share
75. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Colin Koopman Review Essay: A New Foucault: The Coming Revisions in Foucault Studies
Bookmark and Share
76. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Jane Mummery Rorty, Derrida, and the Role of Faith in Democracy to Come
Bookmark and Share
77. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Penelope Deutscher “Women and so on”: Rogues and the Autoimmunity of Feminism
Bookmark and Share
78. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Bernhard Waldenfels Politics on the Borders of Normality
Bookmark and Share
79. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Diane Enns Beyond Derrida: The Autoimmunity of Deconstruction
Bookmark and Share
80. Symposium: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Advertisement
Bookmark and Share