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61. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
W.P. Haggerty Liberty, Wisdom, and Grace: Thomism and Democratic Political Theory by John P. Hittinger
62. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Arthur Hippler Critics of the Enlightenment: Readings in the French Counter-Revolutionary Tradition by Christopher Olaf Blum
63. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Augusta Gooch An Introduction to the Love of Wisdom: An Essential and Existential Approach to Philosophy by James Harold
64. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Stephen M. Krason An Essay on the Restoration of Property by Hilaire Belloc
65. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Stephen M. Krason Constitutional Chaos: What Happens When the Government Breaks its Own Laws by Andrew P. Napolitano
66. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Mary Ann Kreitzer War Against the Weak by Edwin Black
67. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Daniel C. O'Connell, S.J. Analyzing Political Discourse: Theory and Practice by Paul Chilton
68. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Daniel C. O'Connell, S.J. Power and Politeness in Action: Disagreements in Oral Communication by Miriam A. Locher
69. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Brian Simboli The Literary Book of Economics: Including Readings from Literature and Drama on Economic Concepts, Issues and Themes, Michael Watts ed.
70. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Patrick G.D. Riley Contraception: A Worldwide Calamity?
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The author discusses the effects of contraception, which have borne out the predictions of Pope Paul VI's encyclical Humanae Vitae: the explosion of out-of-wedlock births, lack of respect for women, STD's, HIV/AIDS, etc. The overpopulation claims that fed the acceptance and promotion of contraception have been discredited by demographers; now the social costs of underpopulation are increasingly apparent. Acceptance of contraception has now also led to an embracing of morally objectionable technologies like cloning. This is the latest consequence of the separation of sex and reproduction signaled by the acceptance of contraception.
71. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Society of Catholic Social Scientists - Philippines Chapter A National Perfidy (a position paper presented by the Society of Catholic Social Scientists - Philippines Chapter)
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This is a position paper presented by the Society of Catholic Social Scientists Philippines Chapter reacting to House Bills No.16, 2029, 2042 and 2550 in the Congress of the Philippines, which are measures to control population growth in the Philippines
72. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Documentation
73. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Stephen M. Krason New Directions for U.S. Foreign Policy: Catholic Social Teaching as a Guide
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The author argues that there are serious problems from the standpoint of Catholic social teaching (as well as traditional Western thought and simple prudence) in making the forcible spreading of democracy an objective of U.S. foreign policy. He argues that U.S. policy, in light of Catholic social teaching, should be prudently interventionist—but not primarily in a military sense—in promoting human rights, diffusing international tensions, and peacekeeping. Also, the author discusses such questions as shaping U.S. foreign policy in conjunction with allies and foreign aid, in light of Catholic social teaching.
74. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Stratford Caldecott The Sane Economy Project of the G.K. Chesterton Institute for Faith and Culture
75. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Annual Conference Schedule
76. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Stephen M. Krason Good Intentions, Unintended Consequences, and Speculative Harm: Current American Scourges
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The author notes how American public policy typically springs from good intentions, but brings unforeseeable consequences that cause new social problems. It also increasingly seeks to address speculative, not actual or certain, harms. He gives numerous examples and argues that the effect is increasingly expansive state power and heightened intrusion into private areas of individual and family lives. He also argues that all three public policy trends grow out of modern utopian tendencies and secularism.
77. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 10
Members’ Accomplishments
78. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 11
Deborah S. Sturm The “Quality of Life” Ethic and the Push for “Living Wills”
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The publicity surrounding the Terri Schiavo case has led many Americans to request copies of the “living will.” This document is the primary choice of euthanasia enthusiasts because of the standard form’s general presumption for death. The mentality behind the advocacy of the “living will” is that one is better off dead than debilitated or disabled. It is, therefore, dangerous and potentially lethal. The secularist, utilitarian, relativistic, “quality of life” ethic that is at the core of the culture of death, as well as healthcare’s preoccupation with costeffectiveness, is driving the push for “living wills.” Pro-life alternatives to the “living will” are readily available that afford more protection to persons in the event that they cannot speak for themselves. The author has over twenty years of experience working in healthcare facilities: twelve years in the field of diagnostics as a radiologic technologist and nine years in the field of nursing. As a registered nurse, she has worked in long-term care, adult mental health, and geriatric psychiatry.
79. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 11
Emil B. Berendt, Judith Leonard Profiles of Responders to a Natural Family Planning Awareness Campaign
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A Natural Family Planning (NFP) public awareness campaign was conducted in the Diocese of Wichita, Kansas, under the auspices of the NFP office. This article presents an analysis of client data collected. The goals of the program were to raise awareness of NFP and elicit inquiries from the community-at-large. The data suggests that there is wide interest in NFP from the non-Catholic community and that responders to the campaign came from several distinct groups, each with its own characteristics. Based on the successful outcomes of the program, ways of segmenting the target market in future NFP awareness campaigns are presented.
80. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 11
Alfred R. D’Anca Family and Self-Control: Evaluating Gottfredson and Hirschi’s General Theory of Crime in the Context of Catholic Social Teaching
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A paucity of studies address deeper dimensions of the influence of the family on crime. In A General Theory of Crime (1990), Hirschi and Gottfredson emphasize the significance of effective parenting in the development of high levels of self-control and less likely criminal involvement based on their view of human nature. The values-based social teachings of the Catholic Church that emphasize central themes of human and personal dignity, the common good, and communion ofpersons in the family and society, provide a basis to contribute to and develop the empirical significance of the family experience and parenting in the development of self-control, and establish a more validating basis for criminal justice policy.