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61. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Roman A. Tokarczyk Universal Dimensions of Natural Law
62. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Charles S. Brown The University, Dialogue and Universalism
63. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Christian Imieliński The Ideas of Contemporary Universalism and Medicine
64. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Leopold Gr. Seidler, Leszek S. Kolek Rotarians in a Changing World
65. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Zbigniew Krawczyk Categories of the Ethics of Sport
66. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Paris Arnopoulos Cosmopolitan Universalism: Prolegomena to a Future Ideology
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This paper looks into the recent trends leading towards a renewed world order and proposes some distinct ways to promote it. The contemporary global problematique is symptomatic of a revolutionary period of transition from the modern to the post-modern era. During this thne of upheaval and instabiUty, many outdated structures are being dismantled and various innovative systems are being attempted. Only when the winners have been determined and the major choices made, will the new social system settle down into a relative peace once again.
67. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Tsung-I Dow Universality in Chinese Culture
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Chinese culture may be identified as Confucian in that the ideas initiated by Confucius and reinterpreted by Confucius' defenders have overwhelmingly molded the Chinese way of life since the Han dynasty. There are elements which, in the long evolutionary process in both theory and practice, can be considered universal in terms of sustaining, enjoying and searching for the meaning of life. This paper attempts to single out such characteristics in Chinese culture for references for universality. They are: 1) the twofold complementary and contradictory world view, 2) the concept of self-realization of the creative mind to practice reciprocity in resolving human relations, and 3) the attempt to establish a universal state, and 4) the potential of Chinese written characters as a universal computer language.
68. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Marie Pauline Eboh Africa: The Role Model of Planetary Solidarity: Between All Humans and the Human Universum
69. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Lesław Michnowski Holistic Approach to Development
70. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Andrzej Nowicki A Voice in Discussion About Mr. Tsung-I Dow's Report
71. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Jacob Juchler The Post-Socialist Change in Eastern Europe: Specific Development or Universal Trend of Global History?: A Formation Approach
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The paper analyzes the transformation in Eastern Europe in the perspective of global history and compares it to actual world-wide developments. The theoretical frame of reference is a strongly modified formation theory which allows for a truly comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main topic is the presentation of basic aspects of the fundamental changes in postsocialist societies in comparison with global tendencies: the economic process with its deep crisis, the political process with its instabilities, the changes in social consciousness with their complicated contradictions and some social features such as rising intolerance and violent conflicts. Finally future options are discussed.
72. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 2/3
Andrzej Wierciński Philosophy of Universalism and the Concept of Human Nature
73. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Janusz Kuczyński Dialogue - Solidarity - Covenant - Synergy
74. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Venant Cauchy The Universal and the Particular Reflections on the Future
75. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Jan Szczepański Florian Znaniecki's Concept of a Humanist All-mankind Civilization
76. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Michael H. Mitias Universalism and the Meaning of History
77. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Brian Locke The Global Framework Into Which the Solution of the Middle East Problem Fits
78. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Zdzisław L. Sadowski Development, Universalism and Systemic Change in Central Europe
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An unsolved contradiction exists between the universal zest for economic growth and the menace to the future of mankind which results from it. It cannot be solved as long as human thinking is focussed on short-term issues. The global predicament of humanity calls for imiversal solutions. There is an urgent need to overcome all kinds of political and ideological Manicheism in order to arrive at universal understanding of the real problems of mankind. The present experience of Coitral European countries which find themselves in a unique historical situation of transforming their economic, social and political systems in the conditions of global predicament offers observations of relevance for the universal solutions.
79. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Albert A. Anderson Universal Love
80. Dialogue and Humanism: Volume > 4 > Issue: 5
Piotr Jaroszyński Kalokagathia
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To understand the meaning of kalokagathia one must take into account not the contemporary but the Greek theories of beauty and the good. Beauty in the Greek tradition had at least three significations: as an end in itself, as harmony, and what pleases as seen. The so conceived beauty comes to a very close relation with the moral goodness, especially with bonum honestum.Bonum honestum is also an end in itself, and, when other moral values are properly related to it, there is a harmony on the personal as well as on the social level. And finally, the moral goodness is something to be admired (it pleases as seen). The concept of kalokagathia, then, was at the core of morality, education and culture. It is too precious a pearl to be forgotten.