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Displaying: 51-60 of 124 documents

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51. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 3
Nancy Rankin A Substantive Revision to Firth's Ideal Observer Theory
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This paper examines Ideal Observer Theory and uses criticisms of it to lay the foundation for a revised theory first suggested by Jonathan Harrison called Ideal Moral Reaction Theory. Harrison’s Ideal Moral Reaction Theory stipulates that the being producing an ideal moral reaction be dispassionate. This paper argues for the opposite: an Ideal Moral Reaction must be performed by a passionate being because it provides motivation for action and places ethical decision-making within human grasp.
52. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 3
Thomas Jared Farmer Relational Obligations: Defending a Non-Voluntarist Argument for Special Responsibilities
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This paper attempts to demonstrate that special responsibilities exist as a necessary and fundamental component of relationships. It seeks to show that, while special responsibilities may be superseded by other relevant concerns, they remain absolute. The paper attempts to demonstrate further that, even in cases of repugnant conclusion, special responsibilities exhibit a residual nature. It argues that such obligations are not always voluntary entered, but nevertheless represent prima facie duties to those parties involved.
53. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 3
Kyle Shaffer The Skeptic's Language Game: Does Sextus Empiricus Violate Normal Language Use?
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This paper seeks to critique Pyrrhonean skepticism by way of language analysis. Linguistic aspects of Pyrrhonism are first examined utilizing the later writing of Wittgenstein. Pyrrhonean language-use is then critiqued using H.P. Grice’s concept of implicature to demonstrate shared knowledge between speakers. Finally, a teleological model of communication is sketched using ideas from Jerry Fodor. If the Pyrrhonist denies speaking to communicate mental states, we are justified in questioning why we should listen to what she says.
54. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 3
Notes for Contributors
55. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 3
Jared Lincourt If Nietzsche Only Knew
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This paper compares Buddhism with the philosophies of Friedrich Nietzsche and speculates how he would have reacted to Buddhism if he had understood it more accurately. I will focus the discussion on two central philosophies of Buddhism, which Nietzsche misinterpreted: Nirvana and suffering. It will be shown through an examination of selected writings and key philosophies of Nietzsche that if he had a better understanding of Nirvana and suffering then he would have been significantly more favorable towards Buddhism and would have found it to have close similarities to his own beliefs.
56. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 4
Phillip Shannon The Piety of Escape
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This paper examines two seemingly contradictory views of piety found in Plato’s Euthryphro and Crito. Using the Socratic dialogues for evidence of what Socrates actually believed and to piece together a Socratic account of piety, it seems that his argument in favor of remaining in prison is inconsistent with his own beliefs. The paper concludes that Socrates ought not to have thought it was impious to escape from prison.
57. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 4
Stephen Bailey Certainly Uncertain: Nietzschean Pessimism for an Optimistic World
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In this paper, I contrast pre- and post-Socratic Greek thought, particularly with respect to Apollonian optimism and Dionysian pessimism. I show how Socrates’ judgment of a “right” way of living undermined Greek pessimism and was the first step towards modern scientific optimism, the belief that the world can be understood. I then argue that new developments in quantum physics make this optimism untenable, and I finally assert that Nietzschean pessimism is a coherent and beneficial metaphysical perspective.
58. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 4
Jenna Kreyche How We Are Moral: Benevolence, Utility, and Self-Love in Hobbes and Hume
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In this paper, I reconstruct Hobbes’ theory of self-love. I then examine Hume’s arguements that (i) self-love does not properly account for moral behavior and (ii) self-love is unnecessary for moral theory. I argue that Hobbesian self-love can account for both of Hume’s objections. Further, I use an analysis of Hobbes’ Deliberation to show, contra Hume, that self-love does not entail a lack of intention in moral action.
59. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 4
Anthony Adrian Ruminations on Intermittent Existence
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Can objects exist, cease to exist, and then exist once more? I lay out three ways to think about intermittent existence (IE). The first section is based on intuitions. The second section will show that the intuitions are bolstered by the concept of supervenience. The final section will argue that the strongest way to think about IE, and about supervenience, is in terms of mereology, the theory of parts and wholes.
60. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 4
Leonardo Moauro A Critical Assessment of George Klosko’s Version of the Principle of Fair Play
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The nature of our obligation to obey the law has consistently been an important object of philosophical dispute. Fair play based theories of obligation purport to show that it is unfair for us to benefit from an organizational scheme (such as the state) without contributing our fair share to the provision of goods. George Klosko is a major proponent of this approach. I develop his particular version of the argument from fair play into a defensible theory of citizens’ obligation to obey the laws of their state.