Search narrowed by:



Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 51-60 of 1026 documents

0.036 sec

51. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Erik Baldwin The Hiddenness Argument: Philosophy’s New Challenge to Belief in God
52. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
William Lane Craig Necessary Beings: An Essay on Ontology, Modality, and the Relations between Them
53. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Matthew D. Wright Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law
54. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
News and Announcements
55. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Elijah Hess The Mechanics of Divine Foreknowledge and Providence: A Time-Ordering Account
56. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Chad Meister Rethinking the Trinity: On Being Orthodox and Au Courant
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
There is a renaissance of interest in the doctrine of the Trinity. Keith Ward’s book, Christ and the Cosmos: A Reformulation of the Trinitarian Doctrine, is a recent and important work that attempts to reimagine the doctrine of the Trinity in a contemporary context. The following symposium engages with this important work and offers profitable discussion on the doctrine of the Trinity today. It includes an opening essay in which Professor Ward delineates his views, nine essays by leading philosophers and theologians responding to his work, and his replies to the respondents. This essay provides some background to the discussion.
57. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Craig J. Hazen Editor’s Introduction
58. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Keith Ward Reimagining the Trinity: On Not Three Gods
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
If God is agape-love, this implies that God creates and relates to other personal beings, in giving to, receiving from, and uniting those beings to the divine in love. In this relationship, God is threefold—the primordial source of all (the Father), the expressive image of divine love (Jesus), and the unitive power which unites the cosmos to the divine (the Spirit). These are three different “forms of instantiation” (hypostases) of one divine mind (ousia), not three distinct consciousnesses (the “social Trinity”). The threefold mind of God is not “modalist,” but an essential and indissoluble form of the divine nature.
59. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Stephen T. Davis Comments on Keith Ward’s Christ and the Cosmos
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The present essay is a response to Keith Ward’s recent book, Christ and the Cosmos. While deeply appreciative of this fine book, I raise two criticisms of it: (1) Ward’s claim (in agreement with much of the tradition) that we can know nothing of the divine essence has disturbing implications, the main one of which is that there may be large disjunctions between what God has revealed to us about the divine nature and the divine nature in itself. (2) Ward’s criticisms of the social theory of the Trinity are not compelling and indeed edge his own view close to modalism.
60. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Richard Swinburne Response to Keith Ward, Christ and the Cosmos
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Keith Ward understands the Trinity as “one conscious being” and the divine “persons” as three necessary modes of divine action. But he does not give a good reason for supposing that there must be just three modes of divine action. I argue that by contrast all the theories of the Trinity developed from the Nicene Creed by patristic and medieval writers, are “social” theories, or “three persons” theories (in a modern sense of “person”). I defend my a priori argument for the justification of a social theory—that three persons are the necessary minimum for the realization of perfect love, and (in the case of divine persons) the necessary maximum for this.