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51. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Istvan Danka, Juha Saatsi VLE Wiki as Philosophy Assessment
52. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
David Webster What Buddhism is Not: Presenting Buddhism to Students in the Twenty-first Century
53. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Stephen Bullivant Teaching Atheism and Nonreligion: Challenges and Opportunities
54. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Gwilym Beckerlegge Teaching About Religions of South Asian Origin at the Open University: A Reflection on the Scope and Limitations of Flexible Learning
55. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Opinderjit Kaur Takhar, Stephen Jacobs Confusing the Issue: Field Visits as a Strategy for Deconstructing Religious Boundaries
56. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Mark Addis Philosophy in Post-92 Universities
57. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Emma Salter Purusa Sukta: Creating the Cosmos and Mapping the Methods
58. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
About Discourse
59. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Lawrence Harvey Beyond Active-Stasis
60. Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies: Volume > 10 > Issue: 2
Renée Smith Reading to Learn to Read Philosophy
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Given the right sorts of reading assignments, students can learn to read philosophy by reading philosophy. This paper identifies a number ofobstacles to students’ reading philosophy and recommends re-envisioning student-learning outcomes in light of the revised Bloom’s taxonomy of learning objectives and using directed reading assignments that help students achieve them. It describes seven reading assignments in philosophy that emphasize active learning to facilitate students’ learning to read philosophy as they read philosophy.