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41. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Angela Bleeker Should You Ever Tell a Lie?
42. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
About the Contributors
43. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Margot Rashba The Good Student
44. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Scott Daniel The Madman in the Marketplace: A Critique of Nietzsche
45. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Steve Goldberg Frog and Toad Go to High School: A Review of Tom Wartenberg’s A Sneetch is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries
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A review of the book A Sneetch is a Sneetch by Thomas Wartenberg. The book provides insight to deeper philosophical questions through the critical reading of children’s stories. The review provokes philosophy teachers to implicate this book and its methods into young-adult philosophical studies.
46. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Sara Ramaswamy Wall of (Google) Glass
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Technological advance like Google Glass are innovative, yet isolating. Though features of such a new technology can help shape and make lives easier, they disconnect our natural human behaviors. The immediacy of technology may cause us to lose our abilities to be patient, rationalize, and allow for error, which are all natural and important parts of building personality and psyche development.
47. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
James Drueckhammer Free Will
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Third place PLATO contest winner James Drueckhammer argues for the existence of libertarian free will by way of describing and dissecting Aristotle’s theory of the agent-causal theory against its most popular refutation. In the end to the author gives libertarian free will prominence and life.
48. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Hannah Sherman Personal Identity Dialogue
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The author examines one of the most important questions in philosophy as she is asked “What is an identity?” and “What is the self?” She analyzes and debunks this question through a dialect between her and multiple “philosophers”.
49. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Madison Mastrangelo Replacing Rote, Applying Ethics
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A questioning of the proficiency of the American education system judged by preparedness of students for further education written by a junior in an American High School. He hypothesizes that knowledge of ethics can produce preparedness and is missing from American education system and needs to be utilized.
50. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Jared Corbet Probabilistic Chains
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In this PLATO winning essay, Jared Corbet discusses the strength of the hard determinism argument against the notion of free will through historical lenses and comparisons to alternative theories such as libertarianism and compatibilism. Corbet in the end finds hard determinism to be the most logical explanation.
51. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Elvira Klapp Machiavelli and Aristotle: The Virtuous Mean
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Examines a conflict found in the writings of Aristotle and Machiavelli considering steps towards a life of virtue and prominence. Aristotle puts value on happiness and welfare en route to a good life whereas Machiavelli is focused on the ability to use both good and bad action to control a situation. The author concludes balance of these qualities, a virtuous mean, is the most beneficial option, a notion that Machiavelli not directly but philosophically challenges.
52. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Rory E. Kraft, Jr. Editor's Note
53. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Justice and Plato’s Republic
54. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 14
Sydney To Freedom in Degrees
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In this runner-up PLATO contest essay, Sydney To proposes that humans have free will due to human’s unique ability of self-ownership. As long as we are not inappropriately influenced, we can choose, progress, or influence ourselves appropriately. She cites our ability of self-control and self-revision as a representation of free will, which is a sufficient amount to make life meaningful.
55. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 2
Hugh Taft-Morales Voices, Rights, and Reason
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Small-group discussion and documentation between three students that explains their opinion on “what is a right” and the foundation and process of their thinking.
56. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 2
Resources and Ideas for Discussions about Children’s Rights
57. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 2
Talya Birkhahn, Dubi Bergstein Humiliated Elephants
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A student written poem, alongside responses from 2nd and 6th graders on the poem's philosophy.
58. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 2
Hugh Taft-Morales Maya’s Philosophy
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The author's conversation with his daughter, Maya, on Philosophy and rights.
59. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 2
Jana Mohr Lone Methow Valley Elementary School Bill of Human Rights
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Lone conducted weekly philosophical discussions for first and second graders on human rights and how to be treated in society. With “The right to be treated equally” as a nearly unanimous response, Lone records these reactions in a formatted list.
60. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 2
Whitman Middle School Declaration of Human Rights
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In retrospect to “A Bill of Human Rights”, Shapiro initiated a lecture to 6th graders about animal rights, only to execute a mature view on universal human rights and what is ethical for modern society through a child’s perspective.