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461. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 6
New Books: Translations
462. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 6
Dorit Bar-On Expressive Communication and Continuity Skepticism
463. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 6
Adam Hochman Against the New Racial Naturalism
464. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 7
Memo to Authors
465. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 7
Mario Gómez-Torrente How Quotations Refer
466. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 7
Diane Proudfoot Rethinking Turing’s Test
467. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 8
New Books: Anthologies
468. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 8
Ellen Clarke The Multiple Realizability of Biological Individuals
469. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 8
Douglas W. Portmore Perform Your Best Option
470. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 8
Johan E. Gustafsson The Irrelevance of the Diachronic Money-Pump Argument for Acyclicity
471. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 9
Susanna Schellenberg Belief and Desire in Imagination and Immersion
472. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 9
Tim Maudlin Geometric Possibility by Gordon Belot
473. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 9
New Books: Translations
474. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 110 > Issue: 9
Andy Clark Expecting the World: Perception, Prediction, and the Origins of Human Knowledge
475. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 111 > Issue: 1
New Books
476. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 111 > Issue: 1
Penelope Mackie Mere Possibilities: Metaphysical Foundations of Modal Semantics by Robert Stalnaker
477. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 111 > Issue: 1
Jeremy Butterfield Reduction, Emergence, and Renormalization
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In previous work, I described several examples combining reduction and emergence: where reduction is understood a la Ernest Nagel, and emergence is understood as behaviour that is novel. Here, my aim is again to reconcile reduction and emergence, for a case which is apparently more problematic than those I treated before: renormalization. My main point is that renormalizability being a generic feature at accessible energies gives us a conceptually unified family of Nagelian reductions. That is worth saying since philosophers tend to think of scientific explanation as only explaining an individual event, or perhaps a single law, or at most deducing one theory as a special case of another. Here we see a framework in which there is a space of theories endowed with enough structure that it provides a family of reductions.
478. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 111 > Issue: 11
Anja Karnein Putting Fairness in Its Place: Why There Is a Duty to Take Up the Slack
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The view that agents are not obliged to do more than their initial fair shares when their fellow duty bearers fail to comply has prominent defenders, including Liam Murphy and David Miller. While Murphy thinks that asking agents to take up other agents’ slack would be unfair, Miller claims that slack-taking cannot be required because primary responsibility does not migrate from noncompliers to compliers. This paper argues, by contrast, that there are a number of circumstances in which there is a duty to take up the slack even though it is unfair and even though responsibility stays where it is. The central claim is that what agents owe to third parties is a separate issue from how they relate to fellow duty bearers. This proposal also runs counter to familiar defenses of slack-taking that weigh its unfairness against the moral importance of the interests at stake for third parties.
479. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 111 > Issue: 11
Robert Pasnau Veiled Disagreement
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A theory of how rationally to respond to disagreement requires a clear account of how to measure comparative reliability. Such an account faces a Generality Problem analogous to the well-known problem that besets reliabilist theories of knowledge. But whereas the problem for reliabilism has proved recalcitrant, I show that a solution in the case of disagreement is available. That solution is to measure reliability in the most fine-grained way possible, in light of all the circumstances of the present disagreement, but behind a veil that precludes taking into account which views are one's own. This resolves two of the leading obstacles to understanding what disagreement rationally requires: the objection from neglecting the evidence, and the objection from absurd disagreements. Appealing to the contractualist's veil of ignorance also sheds an interesting light on the very different ways in which disagreement gets resolved in epistemology versus political theory. The comparison raises troubling questions on both sides, because it seems doubtful that the political theorist's usual strategies are epistemically rational, and it seems doubtful that the epistemologist's usual strategies are sufficiently attuned to what we care about.
480. The Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 111 > Issue: 11
Alexander Hyun, Eric Sampson On Believing the Error Theory
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In his recent article entitled ‘Can We Believe the Error Theory?’ Bart Streumer argues that it is impossible to believe the error theory. This might sound like a problem for the error theory, but Streumer argues that it is not. He argues that the un-believability of the error theory offers a way for error theorists to respond to several objections commonly made against the view. In this paper, we respond to Streumer’s arguments. In particular, in §§ 2-4, we offer several objections to Streumer’s argument for the claim that we cannot believe the error theory. In § 5, we argue that even if Streumer establishes that we cannot believe the error theory, this conclusion is not as helpful for error theorists as he takes it to be.