Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 41-60 of 23081 documents

0.035 sec

41. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Mark Chapman God’s Continent: Christianity, Islam and Europe’s Religious Crisis by Philip Jenkins
42. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Scott Lowe Prophets and Protons: New Religious Movements and Science in Late Twentieth Century America by Benjamin E. Zeller
43. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Andrew Stuart Abel Chinese Religiosities: Afflictions of Modernity and State Formation by Mayfair Mei-hui Yang, ed.
44. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Michael Paul Oman-Reagan Theater in a Crowded Fire: Ritual and Spirituality at Burning Man by Lee Gilmore
45. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
George D. Chryssides Chanting in the Hillsides: The Buddhism of Nichiren Daishonin in Wales and the Borders by Jeaneane Fowler and Merv Fowler
46. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Jeremy Rapport An Amish Paradox: Diversity and Change in the World’s Largest Amish Community by Charles E. Hurst and David L. McConnell
47. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Stephanie Martin Coming to the Edge of the Circle: A Wiccan Initiation Ritual by Nikki Bado-Fralick
48. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Michael (Anthony) Costabile Gurus in America by Thomas A. Forsthoefel and Cynthia Ann Humes, eds.
49. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Sean O’Callaghan Vampires Today: The Truth About Modern Vampirism by Joseph Laycock
50. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Lola Williamson Yearning to Belong: Discovering a New Religious Movement by John Paul Healy
51. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Göran Larsson The New Black Gods: Arthur Huff Fauset and the Study of African American Religions by Edward E. Curtis IV and Danielle Brune Sigler, eds.
52. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Alexandros Sakellariou Encyclopedia of New Religious Movements by Peter B. Clarke, ed.
53. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Danielle Kirby Exploring New Religions by George D. Chryssides
54. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Jessica Moberg Religion Crossing Boundaries: Transnational Religious and Social Dynamics in Africa and the New African Diaspora by Afe Adogame & James V. Spickard, eds.
55. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Anna M. Hennessey Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth-Century America – Second Edition by Ann Braude
56. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Rūta Ruolytė The Manifestation and Development of New Religions in Lithuania: Case Study of the Art of Living Foundation (Naujųjų religijų raiška ir ypatumai Lietuvoje: „Gyvenimo meno” fondo atvejo studija) by Milda Alisauskiene
57. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Christine O’Leary-Rockey Western Esotericism and Rituals of Initiation by Henrik Bogdan
58. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Arthur Herman God, Evil and Annie Besant
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper is about the impact of a philosophical problem on the life of a most remarkable human being. The problem is the theological problem of evil and the remarkable human being is the one-time Christian, one-time atheist, and all-time theosophist, Annie Wood Besant. Her personal and intellectual encounter with the theological problem of evil changed not only her life but, through her influence, it changed the life of British society in the 19th century and Indian society in the 20th century. Annie Besant's personal encounter with intense human suffering changed her from the wife of a Victorian clergyman and devoted mother into achampion of women's rights, a union organizer, an atheist, and a socialist; and her intellectual discovery of a solution to the problem of human suffering changed her from a free thinking atheist, materialist and secularist into an occultist and theologian and leading light of the Theosophical Society in England and India. In what follows I want to do two things: First of all, say something about Mrs. Besant's extraordinary life in England and India; and then, secondly, say something about the philosophical problem and its solution that played such important roles in her life.
59. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
James R. Lewis The Branch Davidians: Through the Lens of Jonestown
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Ever since Jonestown, part of the “cult” stereotype has been that NRMs are volatile groups, ready to commit group suicide at the drop of a hat. The assumption that the Branch Davidian community was a potential Jonestown may or may not have contributed to the initial ill-advised ATF raid. But, following the fiery holocaust set in motion by the FBI raid 51 days later, defenders of these agencies’ actions uniformly portrayed the Davidians as having been a “suicide group.” The present article presents an overview of the Davidian community, focusing particular attention on evidence that the group was not inclined to suicide. Rather, the Davidians were victims of law enforcement malfeasance.
60. Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review: Volume > 2 > Issue: 1
Inga B. Tøllefsen Ecofeminism, Religion and Nature in an Indian and Global Perspective
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Women tend to take a secondary place in society and also tend to be equated with nature, thus being on the losing end on both fronts, and fighting the same battle against oppression. Ecofeminism has many phases and faces, but one of the most influential is that of spiritual ecofeminism and its many expressions under the New Age umbrella. In an Indian context the picture seems to be different, as spiritual ecofeminism seems to be more closely aligned with “traditional” Hinduism. Vandana Shiva, the most famous Indian ecofeminist writer, faces a massive critique from numerous scholars. Her work is seen as essentialist and as romanticizing history, where a gender analysis perspective would focus on, among others, unequal power relations in society.