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41. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 14
John Hicks An Aesthetics of the Given in Rei Terada’s Looking Away
42. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 14
Yubraj Aryal Modernisms
43. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Daniel W. Smith On the Nature of Concepts
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In What is Philosophy?, Deleuze and Guattari define philosophy, famously, as an activity that consists in forming, inventing, and fabricatingconcepts.” But this definition of philosophy implies a somewhat singular “analytic of the concept,” to borrow Kant’s phrase. One of the problems it posesis the fact that concepts, from a Deleuzian perspective, have no identity but only a becoming. This paper examines the nature of this problem, arguing thatthe aim of Deleuze analytic is to introduce the form of time into concepts in terms of what he calls “continuous variation” or “pure variability.” The aim isnot to rediscover the eternal or the universal, but to find the conditions under which something new is produced (creativeness).
44. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Satwik Dasgupta The Anthropocentric Vision: Aesthetics of Effect and Terror in Poe’s “Hop-Frog”
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The Anthropocentric Vision: Aesthetics of Effect and Terror in Poe’s ‘Hop-Frog’” develops the possible psycho-social results of emotional hegemony through a semi-anthropoid figure who avenges himself on a king desperate to assert and sustain supremacy over his subjects. This essay juxtaposes modern anthropological study and Poe’s fiction; it demonstrates that an anthropocentric study of the author’s aesthetics of terror in “Hop Frog” reveals that what we see and perceive as essential to the titular character’s poetics of revenge and hatred are nothing but a reflection of our (the readers’) own anthropocentrism. This anthropocentric study provides a glimpse into how humans perceive, adapt, and conquer adversarial forces within the society. However, the collapse of the apparent rational order, effected by Hop Frog at the end, also provides a glimpse into the nether side of human consciousness and its illimitable capacity to defy comprehension.
45. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Yubraj Aryal Affective Politics: A Sovereign Way of Cultivating and “Caring of the Self”
46. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Dr Bram Ieven Alain Badiou and the Future of Communism
47. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Iswari P. Pandey Kali, Clodia, and the Problem of Representation
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Re-presenting the historically silenced subjects is among the trickiest negotiations a researcher has to enter, especially when working with ancient texts. This essay uses a quasi-experimental, reader’s-response approach to academic writing to spotlight the problem of “recovering” marginalized subjects from across cultures and (pre-) histories. The major thrust of the inquiry is the rhetorical challenge of representing silenced or marginalized subjects in revisionary work. Weaving together personal reflections and academic arguments, the essay presents the process of scholarly research as a heuristic for formulating arguments. The essay also proposes–and demonstrates–a process-based approach that takes into account researcher’s positionality.
48. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Yubraj Aryal Affective Turn
49. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Contributors
50. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
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