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41. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Michael Davis Second Thoughts on Multi-Culturalism
42. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Peg Tittle Identity Politics as a Transposition of Fraser’s Needs Politics
43. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Howard Klepper Intimacy and Parental Authority in the Philosophy of Ferdinand Schoeman
44. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
William C. Gay Bourdieu and the Social Conditions of Wittgensteinian Language Games
45. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Robert F. Ladenson What Is a Disability?
46. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Peter J. Mehl William James’s Ethics and the New Casuistry
47. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Hans Lenk, Matthias Maring Responsibility and Social Traps
48. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Clifton B. Perry Is Being a Carrier of a Disability, a Disability?
49. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Galina Iachkina An Essay in the Applied Philosophy of Political Economy
50. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Mike W. Martin Professional Distance
51. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Andrew R. Bailey Neurosis: A Conceptual Examination
52. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Michael C. LaBossiere Racial Identity and Oppression
53. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Stephen Nathanson How (Not) to Think About the Death Penalty
54. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Joseph Sartorelli The Nature of Affirmative Action, Anti-Gay Oppression, and the Alleviation of Enduring Harm
55. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Michael Davis The Justification of Arbitrary Death
56. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Iddo Landau Are You Entitled to Affirmative Action?
57. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Louis Pojman In Defense of the Death Penalty
58. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
A.A. Howsepian Cinematic Realism and Right to Die Legislation
59. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Roger Paden Defining Philosophical Counseling
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According to Kuhn a new scientific discipline comes into existence when a group of scientists adopt a common paradigm within which to conduct research. The adoption of this paradigm senes to focus the attention of the group’s members on a common explanatory task-at-hand and leads them to adopt similar methods and aims, thus making possible the standard puzzle solving activities that allow normal science to advance rapidly. However, Kuhn argues, in pre-paradigm periods and during revolutionary phases, scientists do not engage in such singleminded, puzzle-solving behavior, as the paradigm itself is put into question. Instead, during these periods, they become at least partially self-reflective in that they become interested in understanding the nature of their discipline and its relationships to other disciplines. In this paper, I argue that Philosophical Counseling is in a pre-paradigm period and is in need of a paradigm centered definition if it is to develop an identity and advance rapidly. In an Aristotelian mood, I seek this definition though an examination of the related fiends of psychotherapy and pastoral counseling.
60. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
William Sweet Human Rights and Cultural Diversity
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In this paper, I discuss some challenges to the discourse of universal human rights made by those who insist that the existence of pluralism and cultural diversity count against it. I focus on arguments made in a recent article by Vinay Lal but also address several other criticisms of universal human rights-arguments hinted at, but not elaborated, by Lal. I maintain that these challenges frequently fail to distinguish the discourse of human rights from its adoption by certain states to advance foreign policy objectives, and suggest that, even when these criticisms appear plausible, closer inspection reveals that they are either inconsistent or simply do not succeed. I conclude that the notion of universal human rights still has an important place in a culturally diverse and pluralist world.