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41. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Gertrude Gillette Augustine and the significance of Perpetua’s words: “And I was a man.”
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42. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
William Harmless Augustine and the Bible. The Bible Through the Ages, Volume 2
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43. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Thomas M. Finn Reading Renunciation: Asceticism and Scripture in Early Christianity
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44. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Frederick Van Fleteren Friendship and Society: An Introduction to Augustine’s Practical Philosophy
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45. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Kenneth B. Steinhauser Die handschriftliche Überlieferung der Werke des heiligen Augustinus
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46. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Hubertus Drobner Augustine through the Ages. An Encyclopedia
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47. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Anne-Marie Bowery St. Augustine’s Dilemma. Grace and Eternal Law in the Major Works of Augustine of Hippo
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48. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
R. A. Markus Die Struktur des Menschlichen Geistes nach Augustinus. Selbstreflexion und Erkenntnis Gottes in De Trinitate
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49. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Lawrence S. Cunningham Saint Augustine: Exposition of the Psalms 1-32
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50. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 1
Allan D. Fitzgerald St. Joseph in Early Christianity: Devotion and Theology, A Study and an Anthology of Patristic Texts
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51. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 2
Mark Vessey Foreword
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52. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 2
Peter Brown Introducing Robert Markus
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53. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 2
R. A. Markus Evolving Disciplinary Contexts for the Study of Augustine, 1950–2000: Some Personal Reflections
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54. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 2
James J. O’Donnell The Strangeness of Augustine
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55. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 2
David Peddle Re-Sourcing Charles Taylor’s Augustine
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56. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 32 > Issue: 2
Thomas F. Martin Paul the Patient: Christus Medicus and the “Stimulus Carnis” (2 Cor. 12:7): A Consideration of Augustine’s Medicinal Christology
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57. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Adam Ployd Non poena sed causa: Augustine’s Anti-Donatist Rhetoric of Martyrdom
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This article examines Augustine’s anti-Donatist claim that it is not the punishment but the cause (non poena sed causa) that makes a martyr. Augustine’s non poena sed causa argument arises as part of the larger rhetoric of martyrdom that recent scholarship has highlighted in late antiquity. I argue here that a more specific look at classical rhetorical techniques can provide a better understanding of what Augustine is up to in his particular rhetoric of martyrdom. To that end, after providing an overview of North African martyr discourse, I turn to forensic rhetoric and issue theory as described in Cicero and Quintilian. I show that two types of forensic arguments—one on the issue of definition and other on the contested interpretation of a legal text—shaped Augustine’s non poena sed causa approach to the Donatists’ claims to be the church of the martyrs.
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58. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Justin Shaun Coyle Taking Laughter Seriously in Augustine’s Confessions
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This essay analyzes the subtle theology of laughter that is scattered across Augustine’s Confessiones (conf.). First, I draw on Sarah Byers’s work in order to argue that Augustine adopts and adapts Stoic moral psychology as a means of sorting the laugh into two moral kinds—as evidence of either good joy or bad joy. In turn, these two kinds provide the loose structure for the double theological taxonomy of merciless and merciful laughter that conf. develops. Next, I treat laughter of each sort via exegesis of several textual vignettes. Close readings of key passages show that both merciless and merciful laughter evince distinctive features across Augustine’s conf. This also reveals exactly how Augustine embeds laughter’s double taxonomy in order to confect his own salvation narrative. Thus, on the reading offered here, laughter proves central to the salvation history that Augustine’s conf. weaves. We learn a good deal about Augustine’s story and his theology by attending to the subject, object, and character of laughter that may be found in his conf.
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59. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Scott Bailey Orcid-ID Augustine’s Confessions: iOS version 1.5.3
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60. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic Body Language in Augustine’s Confessiones and De doctrina christiana
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This article examines the role of bodily expressions within Augustine’s theory of signs and language. Philosophical reflection, rhetorical practice, and his own homiletical experience all led Augustine to consider the role played by the body in communicative acts. The invesitgation is sharpened via careful analysis of the rhetorical category of actio and close readings of particular passages that are relevant for Augustine’s understanding of the process of learning language in general and of learning the catechism in particular. The centrality of bodiy signs for the dramatization of the famous scene of Augustine’s conversion in the Milanese garden is also discussed: here, voice and physiognomy express the tragedy of the will, even as bodily signs (taken as natural signs) prove crucial to Augustine’s particular retelling of the story.
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