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301. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Wenceslao Castañares Lines of Development in Greek Semiotics
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Three lines of semiotic thought were developed by Greek culture: that of Medicine, that of the Arts of discourse (Logic, Dialectic and Rhetoric), and finally,that of Language, strictly speaking. Even though these three branches evolved in quite parallel terms, they only slightly influenced one another, which hindered the existence of a general Semiotics. However, this fact does not play down the reflection on Semiosis carried out by the Greeks.
302. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Massimo Leone The Semiotics of Waste World Cultures: On Traveling, Toilets, and Belonging
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Tourism industry is increasingly stripping traveling of one of its most fundamental anthropological and existential values: its being a laboratory in which travelerscan temporarily experience the disruption of their regime of sedentary belonging, protected by a plan of return. According to this perspective, non-touristy travelingis one of the best ways to test the limits of one’s tolerance to cultural diversity and acknowledge, as a consequence, the identity of one’s cultural and existential‘home.’ Yet, modern and contemporary travelogues mostly extol the traveler’s heroic capacity to overcome the limits of tolerance. Claiming that such emphasis stems from the colonial desire to domesticate and assimilate the world and its diversity, the article proposes to subvert this logic and to replace panoramic travelogues, dominated by the will power of subjects, with prosopopoeic travelogues, that tell the stories of how the things of the world, relics of centuries of civilization, reject travelers and their desire of domestication and conquest. As an example of this subversion, the article proposes a semiotic exploration of toilets, their variety, and their ‘cultural resistance.’
303. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Asunción López-Varela Introduction to Semiotics of World Cultures
304. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Dan Lungu Translation and Dissemination in PostCommunist Romanian Literature
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Translation is a fundamental part of cultural dissemination. Based on an empirical qualitative research, the first part of this article presents the effects that thewave of translations after 2005, the first of utmost importance in the Romanian cultural environment, engaged in the local literary field, and in the second part there are brought into discussion some important intercultural barriers in translation and promotion of literature abroad, such as defining literature in a different way, new forms of censorship or problematic semiotic codes of literature of revolt.
305. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Dennis Ioffe The Cultural ‘Text of Behaviour’: The Moscow-Tartu School and the Religious Philosophy of Language
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This paper is focused on the major contributions of the two main schools of semiotic thought in Russia during the 20th century. It considers cultural mythologiesof behaviour as the focal point of the Moscow-Tartu school and then proceeds to the pre-semiotic school of Russian thought, which dealt with the philosophy of the (divine) Name(s). Both traditions are linked by a common preoccupation with the human sign-vehicles-cultural, artistic, literary and religious. Russian semiotics of culture (the author’s life & biography considered as a peculiar kind of a sign-text) and Russian religious philosophy of language (philosophy of the Name) are the most unique scholarly offerings to have originated within the Eastern-European tradition of semiotics.
306. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Ulani Yunus, Dominiq Tulasi Batik Semiotics as a Media of Communication in Java
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Batik industry, Indonesia’s traditional practice of dying cloth through wax resist methods, is considered an important source of intangible cultural heritage andprotected under UNESCO. The industry is very diverse and many different colors and motives are used. Research in this article focuses on Batik in Yogyakarta,Surakarta, Lasem, Tuban and Garut regions. This paper studies the connotative implications of Batik’s cultural significations that pass on from older to youngergenerations revealing the importance of visuality and touch in constructing meaning within certain cultures.
307. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Diego Busiol The Many Names of Hong Kong: Mapping Language, Silence and Culture in China
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Hong Kong is a peculiar case for the study of cultural practices. One of the most Westernized cities in Asia, Hong Kong is, to many people in China, one ofthe most ‘Chinese’ places in the country. Hong Kong’s no-place situation presents an interesting example of the tensions within and without cultural systems and their relations to language.
308. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Ömer Naci Soykan On the Relationships between Syntax and Semantics with regard to the Turkish Language
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A belief commonly held in linguistics and philosophy is that semantics is defined by syntax. In this article, I will demonstrate that this does not hold true for Turkish. A fundamental syntactical rule builds around the successive order of words or speech units in a sentence. The order determines the meaning of the sentence, which in turn is rendered meaningless if the rule is not observed. In a given language, if a sentence retains meaning without this rule being applied, then the rule cannot be said to determine meaning. Turkish, with its mathematical structure, is one such language. In effect, the degree to which semantics is determined by syntax varies considerably from one language to the other. If meaning is constructed through dissimilar means in different languages, then it is not possible to talk about a single theory of meaningfulness valid for all languages. Each language is uniquely determined, and is a reflection of its proper cultural background. A theory of language must take into account this cultural framework. In this paper, I shall deal with a different way of constructing meaning whereby syntax does not determine semantics, and present the linguistic possibilities it gives rise to.
309. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 1 Fashion and the Ethnographic Subject
310. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Conclusion Modernity in Motion
311. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 6 Traditionally Modern: the Haute Couture in Tehran
312. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 8 Pictured Bodies: Photographing for Fashion in Tehran
313. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 3 Oriental Flavors: Designing (for) the Middle East in Paris
314. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 7 After Authors
315. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Reference List
316. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 2 On the Timely Subject Fashion
317. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 5 Gendered Space and Fashion Catwalks: Paris and Tehran
318. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Chapter 4 Fashion and Aesthetic Authority in the Urban Spaces of Tehran
319. Paris Chic, Tehran Thrills: Year > 2013
Alexandru Balasescu Introduction
320. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues South African Animal Legislation and Marxist Philosophy of Law
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Marxist Philosophy as an explanation of social reality has, since the fall of the Berlin Wall, been largely neglected. However, some philosophers have contended that it may still be relevant to explain today’s social reality. In this article, I wish to demonstrate precisely that Marxist philosophy can be relevant to understand social reality. To carry out this task, I show that Marxist philosophy of law can offer a sound explanation of Animal law in South Africa. My argument is that South African law is a superstructure that reinforces the power of the animal farming industry in South Africa. That is, the hidden purpose of the law is to benefit the industry. In order to argue for this, I present two sets of arguments. The first set argues that the law facilitates the functioning of the animal farming industry. In the second set of arguments I contend that the law socialises individuals into approving the methods of slaughtering by the animal farming industry.