Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 31-40 of 124 documents

0.075 sec

31. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 11
Kate Kennedy Ideal Cognition: A Narrowly Constrained Relative Pragmatism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Both the nature and aim of human cognition are philosophically divisive topics. On one side, there are the evidentialists who believe that the sole purpose of cognition is to seek and find truths. In contrast, pragmatists appeal to cognition solely as a tool, something that helps people achieve their goals. In this paper, I put forward an account of cognition and its aims fundamentally based on a pragmatic viewpoint. Crucially, however, I claim that an evolutionary pragmatic picture of cognition must assert rationality as a core tenant of human thought, mooring a relative pragmatism within a system logic and rationality.
32. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 11
Gerald Nelson The Diversity Initiative as Anti-Revolutionary Project
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Through diversity initiatives, academia and business have recruited many new talented individuals from historically underrepresented communities. These institutions are now in the position of possessing, managing, and deploying a massive amount of diverse talent. We examine what we may expect from these institutions as they continue to absorb diverse talent, as well as what we can expect from these talented individuals as they become a newly established class.
33. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 11
David Chalmers Thinking Just Happens: An Interview with David Chalmers, PhD
34. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Jason Huber Rethinking the Binary of Pure Objectivity and Relativistic Chaos
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper seeks to refute some of the common presuppositions of traditional Western epistemologies, which center on the claim that subjectivity cannot be as truth-yielding as "objectivity." This paper argues that aspects of the subjective can effectively be utilized in a valid epistemology attempting to approach an understanding of the truth of lived human experience—i.e. that subjectivity can in certain circumstances be as truth-yielding as, or even more so than, the epistemic ideal of objectivity. Ultimately, this paper concludes that the objective-subjective epistemic binary is artificial and disadvantageous in that neither pure objectivity nor absolute relativity are possible.
35. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Amanda Anais Ruiz Generation Lobotomy: Kinase Inhibition Therapy, Memory Erasure and Identity Loss
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper primarily explores the ethical debate surrounding the use of memory erasure for therapeutic ends. It argues that procedures such as kinase inhibition therapy, which can entail memory erasure in the individual, incur a high cost in terms of the integrity of our individual identities, thus jeopardizing our claim to individual rights and accountability. Therefore, we should reserve such therapies for the extreme cases in which the procedures have the potential to actually restore a person’s autonomy. Furthermore, this paper goes on to explore which situations might fit this criterion, while still accounting for the cost of memory erasure in each instance.
36. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Benjamin Holvey The Skeptic’s Guide to the Genealogy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper seeks to evaluate Nietzsche’s positive ethical vision through a focus on the plausibility of his moral-historical account as it appears in On the Genealogy of Morals. It is then argued that Nietzsche’s account of the “slave revolt in morality” contains shortcomings that necessitate further inquiry into Nietzsche’s consequent ethical vision. Furthermore, the paper goes on to demonstrate that if a proper historical context for the “slave revolt in morality” cannot be identified, or if it cannot be shown that Nietzsche’s ethical vision can stand without such a context, then a neo-Nietzschean ethic must be set aside.
37. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Beth Mendenhall The Environmental Crises: Why We Need Anthropocentrism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In the face of an ensuing environmental crisis, this paper suggests that currently accepted modes of environmentalist thought have not been effective enough in enacting positive change. Anthropocentrism provides something that environmental philosophy needs – wide acceptance and public appeal. This paper argues that an environmental ethic that is weakly anthropocentric, in that it finds value in the environment via human values, can be both internally consistent and highly pragmatic. It goes on to examine some pitfalls of Deep Ecological environmental philosophy, which could be avoided if a weakly anthropocentric environmental ethic were adopted now.
38. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Desiree Valentine Visualizing a Critical Mixed-Race Theory
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper, questions regarding the cultural understanding of mixed race are explored, which have the ability to complicate the accepted portrayal of race in society as a black/white binary system. Thus, the acknowledgement of something other than this binary system offers new ways of theorizing about race, particularly concerning the sociopolitical implications of mixed-race designation. This paper argues that the visually mixed-race person has a certain direct ability to challenge the binary and its racist logic. Furthermore, this paper goes on to offer a unique interpretation of where power for working against a racially oppressive system lies within critical mixed-race theory.
39. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Allison Glasscock A Consistent Consolation: True Happiness in Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper seeks to defend Philosophy’s account of true happiness in Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy. Although philosopher John Marenbon claims that Philosophy provides Boethius with two conflicting accounts of happiness, this paper argues that she consistently advocates a single account of true happiness. Ultimately, the paper claims that Marenbon is mistaken in his interpretation of Philosophy account of true happiness. What Marenbon interprets as an alternate account of the nature of true happiness is actually a component of Philosophy’s dialectical method and not a separate account.
40. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 2
Douglas Romney Morality with an Accent
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper, the difficulties inherent in the debate between moral nativists and antinativists, who differ in their beliefs on the nature of systems of morality, are shown to exemplify the need for philosophers to support their views with empirical data. Furthermore, it proposes that an empirical study of first-generation immigrant populations has the potential to resolve the debate over moral nativism, as it would allow researchers to observe the moral “critical period.” Based on the recent philosophical advances made through experimental evidence, this paper goes on to argue that empirical data is a valuable source of information from which philosophers ought to draw.