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31. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Andrzej Serafin A Reception History of the Black Notebooks
32. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Jesús Adrián Escudero Heidegger’s Black Notebooks and the Question of Anti-Semitism
33. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Anthony J. Steinbock Heidegger, Machination, and the Jewish Question: The Problem of the Gift
34. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Joshua Rayman Heidegger’s “Nazism” as Veiled Nietzscheanism and Heideggerianism: Evidence from the Black Notebooks
35. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 5
Texts of Heidegger cited and abbreviations used
36. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Lawrence J. Hatab The Point of Language in Heidegger’s Thinking: A Call for the Revival of Formal Indication
37. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Shane M. Ewegen The Thing and I: Thinking Things in Heidegger’s Country Path Conversations
38. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Ryan Johnson Thinking the Abyss of History: Heidegger’s Critique of Hegelian Metaphysics
39. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Timothy Sean Quinn Heidegger and Jünger: Nihilism and the Fate of Europe
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In the 1930s, Martin Heidegger began what would become a lifelong engagement with the work of Ernst Jünger. Part of Heidegger’s interest in Jünger was a result of Jünger’s Nietzsche-inspired cultural diagnosis; in Heidegger’s words, Jünger “makes all previous writings about Nietzsche inessential.” On the other hand, Heidegger was critical of what he deemed Jünger’s “bedazzlement” before the thought of Nietzsche. In this essay, I explore the sources of Heidegger’s interest and his criticism of Jünger’s work. To do this, I focus on elements of their correspondence, but mainly on Jünger’s essay “Über die Linie” of 1950 and Heidegger’s response, “Über ‘die Linie’” of 1955. In so doing, I hope to uncover their shared concern for the fate of Europe at the hands of a nihilism of which World War II was, to them, but an expression.
40. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Derek Aggleton The Disunity of Factical Life: An Ethical Development in Heidegger’s Early Work