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201. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 19
Traci C. West The Harms of Sexual Harassment
202. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 19
William J. Meyer On Keeping Theological Ethics Theological: An Alternative to Hauerwas's Diagnosis and Prescription
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Stanley Hauerwas argues that Christian ethics has lost its theological voice because it has accommodated itself to the secular assumptions of modern philosophical ethics. What has led to this fateful accommodation, he argues, is that theology has sought to translate its insights into a nontheological idiom in order to remain publicly intelligible and relevant. My thesis is that Hauerwas rightly recognizes that a fateful accommodation has occurred but wrongly identifies what it is. The real accommodation is found not in theology's attempt to be publicly intelligible and credible but in its widespread acceptance of the modern denial of metaphysics.
203. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Daniel C. Maguire The Feminization of God and Ethics
204. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Robin W. Lovin Empiricism and Christian Social Thought
205. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Thomas W. Ogletree In Quest of Blessing: Feminist Wrestling with Scripture
206. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Warren T. Reich Towards a Theory of Autonomy and Informed Consent
207. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Terence R. Anderson Ethics, Uranium Mining, and Public Participation in Development Decisions
208. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
James H. Weaver, J. Philip Wogaman The American University/Wesley Theological Seminary Joint Seminar on Economic Justice
209. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Robert L. Shinn Ethical Responsibility and the Corporate World: An Educational Experiment
210. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Larry L. Rasmussen Preface
211. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Bruce C. Birch Response to Elisabeth Schűssler Fiorenza
212. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Daniel Rush Finn The Ethical Orientations of Schools of Economic Thought
213. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Thomas A. Shannon Abortion: A Review of Ethical Aspects of Public Policy
214. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Elisabeth Schűssler Fiorenza Discipleship and Patriarchy: Early Christian Ethos and Christian Ethics in a Feminist Theological Perspective
215. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
Jon P. Gunnemann Ethics and Management
216. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 2
John Badertscher Irony and Liberation: A Study in Canadian History
217. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 20
M. Therese Lysaught Witnessing Christ in Their Bodies: Martyrs and Ascetics as Doxological Disciples
218. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 20
Martha Ellen Stortz Feminist Conversations with Daniel Elazar
219. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 20
William Johnson Everett Kinship and Consent in Daniel Elazar's Covenantal Perspective
220. The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 20
Franklin I. Gamwell The Purpose of Democracy: Justice and the Divine Good
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On the assumption that Christian theism grounds all valid moral prescriptions in a divine purpose, Christian ethics is fundamentally challenged by the widespread consensus in contemporary democratic theory that justice should be separated from any comprehensive good. This essay responds to that challenge through a criticism of separationist theories of justice and a summary argument for democratic principles that depend on the divine good. Democratic justice is compound in character or includes a difference between formative principles, by which a political discourse about the good is constituted, and substantive principles, which should be convincing within the democratic discussion and debate. I argue programmatically that a theory of justice as general emancipation is compound and specifies Christian ethics to politics.