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Displaying: 201-220 of 240 documents

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201. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Court Lewis Resisting Violence and Domination: Review of Howard Caygill, On Resistance: A Philosophy of Defiance
202. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Tom Hastings Civil Resistance Wisdom from Three Quaker Elders: Review of Staughton Lynd and Alice Lynd, editors, Nonviolence in America: A Documentary History; and George Lakey, How We Win: A Guide to Nonviolent Direct Action Campaigning
203. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Walter “Jerry” Kendall Terrestrial: Neither Global nor Local: Review of Bruno Latour, Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime
204. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Court Lewis Songs of Social Protest: Review of Dario Martinelli, Give Peace a Chant: Popular Music, Politics and Social Protest
205. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Court Lewis To Understand All is to Forgive All: Review of William Irwin, Little Siddhartha: A Sequel
206. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Robert L. Holmes Understanding Evil From The Perspective of Nonviolence
207. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Robert Gould Are Pacifists Cowards?: A Consideration of this Question in Reference to Heroic Warrior Courage
208. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Sanjay Lal Hume and Gandhi: A Comparative Ethical Analysis
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Key aspects of Mahatma Gandhi’s ethical theory can be understood by way of the framework provided by David Hume’s ethics. While respecting contextual differences as well as those in over all outlook between a Sanatani Hindu reformer and a Western empiricist, I show that Gandhi and Hume mutually illuminate each other’s thought on significant ethical matters. These matters are: (1) The inability of reason to produce action (2) The relationship of reason to the emotions (3) The importance of the commonality of moral sentiments among humans (4) Identification (a kind of sympathy) as the proper starting place for morality. I hope to show that a greater viability in each thinker’s views can be noticed by those schooled in traditions different from what each respectively represent.David Hume’s ethics provide a framework for understanding key aspects of Mahatma Gandhi’s ethical theory. Indeed, for certain students of philosophy in the West, Gandhian ethics may gain status as a viable approach in moral philosophy when seen from a Humean standpoint. In what follows, I will examine four significant aspects of Gandhian ethics: (1) The limitations of reason to produce moral action. (2) The secondary status of reason in relation to the emotions in morality. (3) The importance of moral sentiments in the general population for devising a system of morality. (4) The place of identification (a kind of sympathy) for the origin of morality. I will show that all four are not only significant aspects of Humean ethics but that when understood from David Hume’s framework these parts of Gandhi’s philosophy should appear all the more plausible to those steeped in the analytic tradition.
209. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Andrew Fitz-Gibbon Rehabilitating Nonresistance
210. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Guidelines for Manuscript Submissions
211. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Rajmohan Ramanathapillai Gandhi on Negative and Positive Conversions
212. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Wendy C. Hamblet Beyond Guilt and Mourning: A Critique of Postmodern Ethics
213. The Acorn: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
b. l. g. To the Reader
214. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Court Lewis Reframing Islam as a Nonviolent Force: Review of Chaiwat Satha-Anand. Nonviolence and Islamic Imperatives
215. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Sanjay Lal Ahimsa as a Way of Life: Review of Predrag Cicovacki and Kendy Hess, editors. Nonviolence as a Way of Life: History, Theory, and Practice
216. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
William Gay Undermining Neoliberalism: Review of Todd May. Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction
217. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Barry Gan Remembering Gene Sharp: Theorist of Political Nonviolence
218. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Contributors
219. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Jack DuVall Gene Sharp and the Twenty-First Century
220. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Greg Moses Editor's Introduction