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201. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Alfred D'Anca, Sr. Eileen Fagan, SC Drug Courts and Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges for a Retributive Age
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In this retribution-centered age of American criminal justice, with continued high rates of drug offenses, the Drug Treatment Court (DTC) model has emerged as a means of managing the needs of non-violent drug offenders through multidisciplinary teams that include judges, prosecuting and defense attorneys, and treatment providers. Now operative in state and Federal jurisdictions, the model is characterized by a more therapeutic vision of law, an acknowledgment of the drug offender as redeemable, a supportive but accountable relationship between judge and drug offender, and non-adversarial collaboration by court officials and treatment providers. This paper examines relevant principles of Catholic social teaching which tend to affirm the innovative drug treatment court model as a rehabilitative and restorative approach to justice by which both the needs of drug offenders and community safety are addressed. The agreement between Catholic social teaching and the principles underlying drug treatment courts is reflected in the Church’s support for legislation favoring community and faith-based outreach offender programs.
202. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Alex D. Binder Money, U.S. Monetary Policy, and Catholic Social Teaching
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The Popes have directly and indirectly taught that money ought to serve man and be used for the common good. They have also condemned the idolatry of money and warned those who manage it for society to do so responsibly and according to the principle of subsidiarity. Money is the “life-blood” of the market economy, yet its creation and distribution is widely misunderstood in the United States. The Federal Reserve has less control over the money supply than is commonly thought because of their commitment to provide an elastic currency, and the federal government must maintain monetary sovereignty in order to pursue the goals of full employment and price stability. Though an elastic currency and monetary sovereignty are potentially inconsistent with Catholic teaching, they are not inherently so, as long as those with power act for the good of all.
203. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
D. Brian Scarnecchia SCSS Response to the Draft General Comment on UN Human Rights Council Resolution 29/22 on “Protection of the Family”
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This statement was submitted to the UN Human Rights Council by the SCSS and a sister organization, the International Solidarity and Human Rights Institute (headed by SCSS Treasurer D. Brian Scarnecchia of Ave Maria School of Law) in their capacity as NGOs. Scarnecchia drafted the statement, which calls upon the Council to insist on the upholding of true marriage and protection of unborn human life as part of the rights of the family and links them with protecting the environment. It says that “human ecology” must be protected along with physical ecology, that they cannot be separated. It proposes use of the Public Trust Doctrine from Anglo-American common law to do this. It especially deplores the attempt to impose same-sex “marriage” and abortion rights on the Developing World.
204. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
23rd Annual National Meeting-Conference Schedule
205. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Allan C. Carlson Jeremy Beer, The Philanthropic Revolution: An Alternative History of American Charity
206. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Clifford Staples Stratford Caldecott, Not As the World Gives: The Way of Creative Justice
207. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Charles K. Bellinger Sue Ellen Browder, Subverted: How I Helped the Sexual Revolution Hijack the Women’s Movement
208. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen M. Krason 1965: The Dawn of Our Current Age
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2015 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). It discusses the seminal year 1965 (fifty years before the column appeared), when so many of our current social, cultural, and political problems and our difficulties in the Church began to take shape. It discusses the nature of the “new direction” that became evident that year, how crucial trends took shape, and how the developments of that year led to others in the short or long run.
209. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Adam Tate William B. Kurtz, Excommunicated from the Union: How the Civil War Created a Separate Catholic America
210. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Kevin Schmiesing Todd Scribner, A Partisan Church: American Catholicism and the Rise of Neo-Conservative Catholics
211. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Kieran Flanagan Gerd-Rainer Horn, The Spirit of Vatican II: Western European Progressive Catholicism in the Long Sixties
212. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
D. Paul Sullins Truth and Anti-Truth: Faith, Reason, and Rhetoric in the Public Square
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This is the speech that Fr. D. Paul Sullins, Ph.D. gave at the 2015 Society of Catholic Social Scientists national meeting-conference upon his reception of that year’s Pope Pius XI Award for Contributions toward the Building Up of a True Catholic Social Science.
213. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Andrew M. Essig Geoffrey Shaw, The Lost Mandate of Heaven: The American Betrayal of Ngo Dinh Diem, President of Vietnam
214. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
James B. Williams In Memoriam: Kenneth D. Whitehead (1930–2015)
215. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen Sharkey Pierpaolo Donati and Paul Sullins, The Conjugal Family: An Irreplaceable Resource for Society
216. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen M. Krason Paul Kengor, Takedown: From Communists to Progressives, How the Left Has Sabotaged Family and Marriage
217. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen M. Krason The True Story—and Tragedy—of Race in America
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2015 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). He makes an assessment, in light of Catholic social teaching, of the race issue in America today. He argues that the typical commentary about it ignores obvious realities, is often driven by ideology and the opportunism of self-appointed racial spokesmen, and ignores serious, deep-seated problems in minority communities with tragic consequences.
218. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Ernest A. Greco Mark Riebling, Church of Spies
219. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Michael J. Ruszala Rev. Brian Mullady, OP, Christian Social Order
220. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen M. Krason The Supreme Court’s Same-Sex “Marriage” Decision: Grave Implications and Needed Responses
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2015 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason. wordpress.com). It discusses the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark 2015 decision on same-sex “marriage,” Obergefell v. Hodges, and its likely implications for religious liberty, true marriage, and children. He says it is the latest expression of concocted rights under the Court’s “substantive-due-process” doctrine. He suggests ways to respond to the decision politically and legally—by citizens, organizations, and the use of executive power by a sound president in the near future, and by the Church.