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201. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Duane Windsor IABS - Victoria, British Columbia — 2002 Proceedings Program Chair’s Comment
202. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Paul Dunn, Anamitra Shome Cross Cultural Ethical Differences: Canada and China
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Ethics is of concern to accountants and the accounting profession. Previous studies (Cohen, Pant & Sharp, 1995; Schultz, Johnson, Morrris & Dymes, 1993) find that accountants from different countries tend to view ethical problems differently. According to Hofstede (1980, 1991) this occurs because cultural differences influence ethical decision-making. This study extends the examination of cross-cultural differences using Hofstede's measure of national culture. It is hypothesized that cultural differences will result in accountants from China and Canada making different ethical assessments concerning the reporting of questionable accounting practices to a superior.
203. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
J. Stephen Childers, Jr., Brad D. Geiger Trust as an Asset: The Use of Trust by Internet Firms as a Source of Competitive Advantage
204. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Tara L. Ceranic Machismo y la Mordida: Toward a Theory of Masculinity and Leadership
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The Mexican cultural attribute of machismo will be considered as a major source for the proliferation of corruption throughout the government and society. It is proposed, based on previous research and biological findings, that the inclusion of more women into the government and business will reduce corruption.
205. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Vanessa Hill, Susan Key, Tamani Taylor How Do Race and Gender Affect Organizational Socialization in University Settings?
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This study builds on research that suggests socialization-defined as the learning of important organizational values and norms—is influenced by demographic characteristics of organizational members. Socialization experiences vary among newcomers depending upon their demographic similarity to current members, and this variation affects the turnover of demographically dissimilar newcomers.
206. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Linda M. Sama, Victoria Shoaf The Internet Interface as an Impediment to Ethical Decision-Making: A Research Agenda
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Transactions over the internet pose challenges and concerns for consumers and public policy makers alike that include issues of privacy, accurate product information and quality, and protection of intellectual property rights. Our proposed research explores how ethical decision-making may differ between traditional business modes and the new internet model, and why such differences may occur.
207. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Maureen P. Bezold, Christopher Neck, Richard E. Wokutch Ethical Behavior in Individual vs. Team Sports: Are Team Athletes Less Ethical?
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Empirical evidence suggests that team athletes are less ethical than athletes who participate in individual sports. This paper explores several potential explanations for these findings.
208. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Cynthia E. Clark The Drive For Profit: A Discussion of Motivation in the World’s First Corporations
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This paper chronicles the motivations of key social actors, operating within their situational constraints, who had influence over the development of the world’s first corporations by using the ideologies of nationalism and social responsibility to gain greater insight into organizational response modes.
209. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Brian K. Burton, Michael Goldsby The Institutional-Ideological Model: Alterations and Extensions
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The Institutional-Ideological Model forms the basis for an important way of organizing the field in which social issues scholars operate. Altered and extended to reflect further connections and depth in the model’s concepts, it can be both a useful teaching tool and a way of categorizing and diagnosing issues of interest to the field, in both contexts, institutional theory provides an important tool.
210. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Sefa Hayibor, David Wasieleski Individual Biases on Equity Theory: The Effect of Moral Reasoning on Perceptions of Equity and Fairness
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This paper, based on a discussion session, uses Kohlberg’s (1969) theory of moral development and equity theory (Adams, 1965) to develop propositions concerning employees’ responses to equity or inequity in their relationships with their employers. Portions of this paper have been published in the 2001 Proceedings of the Institute for Behavioral and Applied Management Conference, Charleston, SC.
211. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Cathrine Hansen, Morten Huse Fish Out of Water?: Clergy Working in Secular Organisation
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This paper is about diversity. It is about clergy in secular organizations. This paper is about clergy who has exited from church service and now work in secular working life. Postal and in-depth interviews were used with "exiting clergy". The study shows how there is a discrepancy between expectations from others and the clergy’s own motivation to perform specialised functions based on their past as clergymen. The contributions exemplify how diversity may inspire organizations beyond intentions.
212. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
James J. Kennelly, Finbar Bradley Ireland’s ‘Celtic Tiger’ Economy: A Unique Opportunity To Foster An Ethic Of Sustainable Enterprise
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Ireland's economy has undergone enormous change over the past decade, with rapid development accompanied by increasing pressures upon the natural environment. One element of this process has been the development of an "enterprise culture" within Ireland. In this paper, we argue that Ireland is uniquely advantaged to build upon this enterprise culture, and to develop a "sustainable enterprise culture" that is more consistent with the principles of sustainable development. Indeed, we see this as a unique opportunity to further the development of Ireland in an economically, ecologically, and socially sustainable manner.
213. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Susan Key, Won Sik Suh, Vickie Cox Edmondson, Vanessa Hill A Portrait Of Women Leaders: Demographics, Characteristics & Perceptions
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This exploratory study surveyed approximately 370 women leaders in industry, education, and government about factors that contributed to their success.Results indicate that most successful women come from, and live in, supportive and stable family circumstances. The biggest obstacle that most women leaders faced in achieving success was their gender, and for black women the additional obstacle encountered was their race.
214. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Richard Marens Abandoning The “Government Sucks” Story: Defining Government’s Role In Value-Based Capitalism
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Freeman correctly points out that the “business stuck story” presents a barrier to implementing value-based capitalism, but he ignores the obstacles created by the better financed and propagated “government sucks” story. The reality is that value-based capitalism requires government assistance in three distinct realms. The Schumpeterian principle asserts that government has always proven necessary for subsidizing “creation” and ameliorating “destruction,” while the Keynesian principle assures the continued health of markets through policies that bolster demand. The Jeffersonian principle demands government efforts to strengthen democracy in the public sphere while encouraging it in the private sector.
215. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Ben Wempe, Johannes (Hans) Van Oosterhout Standard Argumentative Strategies in Conceptualizing Business Ethics
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A review of some major theoretical contributions to the field of business ethics over the past fifteen years shows that the present state of the art suffers from some typical childhood diseases. In this paper we look into the manner of problem setting of these theories and identify a number of standard patterns in the conceptualization of business ethics.
216. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Sandra Rothenberg, Maureen Scully Identify Formation in the Mobilization of the Wealthy in the Fight for Income Equity
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In this paper, we look at the prospects for mobilization of the wealthy to contest widening income inequality. We begin by looking at members of an organization that supports the mobilization of grassroots groups on behalf of economic justice. We found among its members an “unexpected voice” - the voice of wealthy people grappling with their fairly invisible wealth and their own surprise that it evoked such a series of emotions and a gradual process they termed “coming out” as wealthy. We discuss the implications of this identity formation and interpretation for the organization’s ability to shape a collective agenda for social change. This study locates a novel space at the intersection of business and society - where the spoils of business are used to redress societal inequalities, and even to reshape how business is conducted.
217. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Jim Wishloff The Seventh Commandment: Prescriptions For Business
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The Catechism of the Catholic Church is plumbed for its insight into business ethics. The prescriptions for right conduct in business offered by this compendium of Catholic doctrine are found to be concentrated in the instruction given for the Seventh Commandment: “You shall not steal.” As expected, theft, the usurping of another’s property against the reasonable will of the owner, is prohibited. Beyond this, however, and perhaps unexpectedly, the Commandment insists on nothing less than a right ordering of the world’s goods based on the dignity of the human person.
218. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Donna J. Wood, Jeanne M. Logsdon A Global Business Citizenship Process Model
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A global business citizen is a multinational enterprise that responsibly implements its duties to individuals and to societies within and across national and cultural borders. In earlier work, we grounded the concept of global business citizen in political theory and showe The theory of global business citizenship is a normative theory of socially responsible business practices across the full span of cultures and regions where a company operates. This paper extends our theory of global business citizenship by developing a process model for implementation.
219. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Barbara Altman, Kimberly Davenport, Kathleen Rehbein, James Weber A Tutorial on Corporate Citizenship
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This workshop session provided a tutorial for the session participants on how to develop, assign and conduct course presentations and projects using Davenport’s Twenty Principles of Corporate Citizenship. Session participants received sample materials from the panelists and heard about their successes and lessons learned. The majority of the session’s time was dedicated to discussing how the participants might use the sample material in their classes or adapt these materials for the participants’ unique application for their class presentations or project assignments.
220. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2002
Sandra Waddock Creating Corporate Accountability: Foundational Principles to Make Corporate Citizenship Real
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This paper explores the growing array of initiatives aimed at creating corporate accountability with the goal of attempting to uncover the foundation principles that underlie them and create a ‘floor’ below which practices are ethically questionable. Using the Global Compact’s nine principles and the work of Transparency International as guides, we find that foundational principles seem to exist in the areas of human rights, labor standards, environment, and anti-corruption initiatives.