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21. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
John K. Ryan Tommaso Campanella: Renaissance Pioneer of Modern Thought
22. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Dieter Turck Marx’ Thesen über Feuerbach
23. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
R. K. Gupta Kant’s Groundwork of Morality
24. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Charles A. Corr Classical Statements on Faith and Reason
25. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Charles A. Corr The Many-Faced Argument
26. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Giorgio Tonelli Oeuvres
27. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Richard P. Desharnais Reason and Faith, Nature and Grace: a Study of Luther’s Commentaries on the Sentences of Lombard
28. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Désirée Park The Moral Philosophy of George Berkeley
29. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Jean Bancal Proudhon: Esquisse d’une explication sociologique du proudhonisme
30. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
David Bonner Richardson Contemporary Concrete Reason and East Asian Influences and Parallels: A Hermeneutical Essay
31. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Paul Tibbetts The Levels of Experience Doctrine in Modern Philosophy of Mind
32. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
Giorgio Tonelli Beiträge zur Geschichte und Interpretation der Philosophie Kants
33. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 3
P. A. Michelis Philosophie et art
34. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
J. Robert Loftis, Andrew P. Mills Annotated Bibliography of Resources for Teaching Plato
35. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
Notes on Contributors
36. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
J. Robert Loftis Introduction
37. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
Robert Colter, Joseph Ulatowski Social Dexterity in Inquiry and Argumentation: An Apologia of Socrates
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While Euthyphro and Apology are widely taught, they do not offer a complete picture of the variety of ways in which Socrates interacts with his interlocutors in Plato’s dialogues. Perhaps the most important point we wish to bring home is that most, if not all, of Socrates’ discussions are carefully calibrated according to a certain social awareness. Through careful analysis of sections of the dialogues, we argue that aspects of discussions between Socrates and his interlocutors should serve as lessons for students and instructors. Students should see that learning to philosophize is a matter of skill development, Instructors should see that one ought to be cognizant of students’ abilities, as well as other relevant information. The upshot of paying attention to Socrates’ interactions is to augment instructors’ and students’ understanding, facilitating the cultivation and development of philosophical skills.
38. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
Audrey L. Anton Teaching Plato’s Cave through Your Students’ Past Experiences
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Plato’s Allegory of the Cave is both a staple in the philosopher’s diet and the lesson that is often difficult to digest. In this paper, I describe one way to teach the Sun, Line, and Cave analogies in reference to students’ personal past experiences. After first learning about Plato’s metaphysics and epistemology through reading Republic VI-VII, students are asked to reflect upon a time in their lives when they emerged from a particular “cave of ignorance.” In reflecting on this experience, students are encouraged to consider how each aspect of the line analogy might be represented in their own experience. Students also consider the epistemological experience turning towards that which is more real. In so doing, students gain a deeper understanding of these lessons by connecting new, abstract, and difficult information (Plato’s Theory of Forms) to information that is so familiar, it is remembered and not merely imagined. Putting Plato’s theories into the context of their own learning experiences facilitates students’ comprehension of the different levels of being and cognition, their interrelation, and the psychological process of increasing understanding.
39. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
Glenn Rawson Critical Thinking in Higher Education, and Following the Arguments with Plato's Socrates
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In spite of his reputations as an impractical skeptic or dogmatic idealist, Plato’s Socrates is often an impressive example of a critical thinker, and we can use Plato’s dialogues to promote such skills in the college classroom. This essay summarizes recent institutional motivations for promoting critical thinking in a student-centered, active-learning pedagogy; compares Plato’s core model of education and fundamental rationale for it; shares an essay–presentation–discussion assignment that serves those modern and ancient goals; and discusses how this flexible type of assignment is especially well suited for Plato’s dialogues, serving students and teachers in a Socratic manner. The first two sections thus situate Plato’s dialogues in relation to the heart of critical thinking in higher education generally. The later sections and Appendix explain a way to “follow the arguments” with Socrates that’s informed both by recent best practices and by much of what we see in Plato’s dialogues.
40. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy: Volume > 2
Carla A. H. Johnson Finding Philosophy in Plato’s Apology
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Students in introductory philosophy courses bring with them varied preconceptions about philosophy and its place in their education and their lives. Rather than assuming we all agree on what it is we are doing when we do philosophy, it can be effective to problematize the discussion from the start. Plato’s Apology of Socrates is a useful tool for this. While interpreted by some philosophers as not particularly philosophical, recent approaches by Sellars and Peterson suggest that the Apology is rich with philosophy. Here Plato’s Socrates reveals much about himself and his own understanding of the love of wisdom. By engaging in a process of mutual disclosure and active discovery of what matters to Socrates, we give students an excellent opportunity to find philosophy for themselves. As a result, students not only retain an understanding of key themes from Plato but also develop skills and attitudes well-suited to life-long philosophical engagement.