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21. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Dr. Paul Shrivastava Ecocentering Strategic Management
22. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Kristin Shrader-Frechette Ethics and the Challenge of Low-Dose Exposures
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In a recent article in American Scientist, a Berkeley expert quips: “Chicken Little is alive and well in America.” Never in history have health and environment-related hazards been so low, he says, while “so much effort is put into removing the last few percent of pollution or the last little bit of risk.” He thinks we have monumental battles over negligible risks, battles that are extraordinarily expensive for the industries that must pay to control pollution or to reduce risk.
23. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Joel Reichart, Patricia H. Werhane, Patricia H. Werhane Introduction
24. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Michael E. Gorman Imaginative Design Challenges to “Do We Consume Too Much?”
25. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
George G. Brenkert Partners, Business and the Environment: Comments on Merchant’s Partnership Ethics
26. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
William McDonough A Boat for Thoreau: A Discourse on Ecology, Ethics, and the Making of Things
27. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
R. Edward Freeman, Joel Reichart Toward a Life Centered Ethic for Business
28. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Bryan G. Norton Clearing the Way for a Life-Centered Ethic for Business: A Response to Freeman and Reichart
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I agree with much of Freeman and Reichart’s paper; so, by way of comment, I will simply supplement his argument in two ways. First, agreeing with their conclusion that we can, and should, re-direct business toward environmental protection without embracing a nonanthropocentric ethic, I will show that the pre-occupation of recent and contemporary environmental ethics with the anthropocentrism/non-anthropocentrism debate is avoidable. It rests on a misinterpretation of possible moral responses to the arrogance with which Western science, technology, and culture has treated nature. A better understanding of the history of the idea of nonanthropocentrism will, I believe, strengthen Freeman and Reichart’s case for pluralism in environmental ethics and values. Second, I will emphasize several points that seem to me to fit well with Freeman and Reichart’s approach, and which would provide important detailing for the type of approach he sketches, arguing that much hard intellectual work stands between us and a satisfactory, and useful, but pluralistic, and life-centered ethic for business and the environment.
29. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Sandra B. Rosenthal The Four Good Reasons for Limiting Consumption: A Pragmatic Perspective
30. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics: Volume > 2
Mark Sagoff Do We Consume Too Much?