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21. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 1 > Issue: Part 1
Kodama Hakaru Grundwort ≫Gerechtigkeit≪: Heideggers Nietzsche-Interpretation
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In this essay I will investigate justice, which is one of the five fundamental words in the metaphysics of Nietzsche, as Heidegger points out in Nietzsche II. Compared with the other four words, this word ‘justice’ is the one most worthy of note. Through the confrontation with Schopenhauer Nietzsche sees justice as sincerity for oneself based on superfl uous power-feelings. In this case, justice means truly knowing. Heidegger sees the justice as truth in the meaning of correctness, but this truth forgets the original sense, i.e. ‘unconcealment,’ and accordingly insists that Nietzsche is the last metaphysician.
22. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Gediminas Karoblis The Question Concerning Dance Technique
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The notion of “dance technique” is so widely used among dancers that it cannot be ignored. A few different meanings of technique are encountered in a dance practice: (1) techniques of the preparation for a dance, (2) dances might be considered as techniques for some other purposes, and, obviously, (3) the dance is distinguished from other dances by implementation of the particular technique. In this essay, the question concerning dance technique is raised following Heidegger’s reflections. Dance technique is the mode of revealing, and cannot be renounced in dance as the profanation of the sacred pureness of it. But the dance vanishes, when there is a non-conscious marionette left, instead of Consciousness of Dance as the Medium between the Music and the Body.
23. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Alexei Chernyakov Heidegger and “Russian Questions”
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In this paper I attempt to connect Heidegger’s analysis of human existence in Sein und Zeit with important themes of Russian concerning the concept of personality and inherited from Byzantium Theology and Greek Patristic
24. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Jonna Bornemark Alterity in the Philosophy of Edith Stein: Empathy and God
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In this article I will examine Stein’s discussions on alterity. In her early writings Stein develops the theme of alterity mainly in relation to the concept of empathy (Einfuhlung) and thus in relation to the other person. In her later writings the theme of alterity mainly relates to God. I will discuss the continuity and discontinuity between these two areas. I will claim that alterity in her early writings can be understood as invisibility within visibility whereas alterity in her later writings can be understood as visibility within invisibility.
25. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Tomas Kačerauskas The Question of Truth in Existential Phenomenology
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The problem of truth in existential phenomenology is analyzed. The author maintains that the concept of truth is inseparable from the concept of reality. In the phenomenology of Lebenswelt (Husserl) and Dasein (Heidegger) reality is the human whole, which changes while an existential project is created. The phenomena are real as much as they take part in our being towards death. The author calls this creation of the existential whole noesis, which embraces both the harmony of human view and disharmony in the light of new project.
26. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Andrei Laurukhin Husserl’s Practical Philosophy: The Project of a Scientific Ethics
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This research sets for itself to show up Husserl’s early theory of action in its two forms—as scientific ethics and theory of values and as phenomenology of will. The author focuses his attention on two points: a problem of parallelism between logic and ethic and the question of how independent from the conceptual and methodical presuppositions of transcendental phenomenology is Husserl in his comprehension of ethical problems and in the elaboration of the idea of practical reason—or, on the contrary, how dependent he is on these presuppositions.
27. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Agata Bielik-Robson Promises and Excuses: Derrida and the Aporia of Narcissism
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The aim of this essay is mainly critical: it intends to demonstrate that despite all the promises to give account of a “deconstructive subjectivity,” Derrida failed to do so. This charge relies on the thesis that Derrida proved unable to rethink critically the concept of narcissism which he himself saw as crucial for the future philosophical understanding of subjectivity. Yet, what Derrida calls the aporia of narcissism is, in fact, not so much the Freudian version of this concept but a deconstructive version of the old Hegelian dilemma of the beautiful soul—and, theoretically speaking, a rather “defunct” one, for it explicitly prohibits any dialectical procedure that could lead us out of this aporetic predicament.
28. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Martin Cajthaml The Care of the Soul in Gorgias
29. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Annette Hilt A Shared Carnal Humanity: The Language of Proximity in Body, World and Alterity
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Human being considered as enigmatic relation to itself and the world centers in carnality. The carnal body as constituent of life is a challenge for our categories of human life, since its own self-awareness backs away from conceptualization. Along with carnality as a theme speaking in Merleau-Ponty’s and Levinas’ implicit dialogue, this article considers a “shared” carnal humanity given in sensual proximity, language and the diachronic style of alterity. Thus, carnality might be a threshold between ontology and ethics, where traces of Levinas’ and Merleau-Ponty’s thoughts might intertwine in structures of being together in a world.
30. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 4 > Issue: Part 1
Jael Kraut Transcendental Subjectivity as Alternative to Adorno’s Objectivist Notion of Subjectivity in his Informal Music
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Th e eradication of the subject in serialism and aleatory composition leads to the elimination of music itself. Proposing a way out this “empty music”, Adorno pleads for a restoration of the subjective elements at work in composition. But since his notion of subjectivity is ambiguous (sometimes it is universal, sometimes he considers it from an objectivist standpoint, that is, as psychological, arbitrary and opposed to objects) his argument fails. Against his objectivist notion of subjectivity, this article proposes a phenomenological reading of the antinomies contemporary music is confronted with, by replacing Adorno’s arbitrary subject with the universal a priori of transcendental subjectivity.