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21. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 6 > Issue: 2
Walter E. Conn Newman on Conscience
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After reviewing Newman’s famous defense of conscience in his Letter to the Duke of Norfolk (1875), this essay assembles Newman’s lifelong reflections on conscience—from his Anglican sermons to his Grammar of Assent (1870)—in a threefold structure: desire, discernment, and demand.
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22. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Vinh Bao Luu-Quang Newman’s Theology of the Immanent Trinity in his Parochial and Plain Sermons: 1829–1834
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This study of two of Newman’s Anglican sermons—“The Christian Mysteries” (1829) and “The Mystery of the Holy Trinity” (1831)—shows that he considered the doctrine of the Trinity to be the foundation of Christian faith. Simultaneously, this study highlights the biblical and patristic underpinnings of Newman’s Trinitarian theology, while showing that he was defending Trinitarian orthodoxy from both “classical heresies” and contemporary Liberalism and Rationalism.
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23. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Edward Jeremy Miller Newman on the Tension between Religion and Science: Creationism, Evolution, and Intelligent Design
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After sketching four contemporary perspectives about the origin of the created world, this essay tests Newman’s contention that conflicts between true religious doctrines and sound scientific discoveries are only apparent: one truth cannot contradict another. In resolving tensions between religion and science, Newman’s advice about being patient with apparent incompatibility seems particularly appropriate in the contemporary debate between Creationism, evolutionary theory, and Intelligent Design.
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24. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Steven D. Aguzzi John Henry Newman’s Anglican Views on Judaism
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The scant scholarship associated with Newman’s Anglican views about Judaism has focused on his negative rhetoric against Judaism and portrayed him as anti-Semitic. His Anglican writings, however, applied terms associated with Judaism in a typological sense to the political and religious realities of his day, primarily to support his apologetic agenda and to highlight threats to the Church of England. Simultaneously, he stressed the positive characteristics of Judaism, illustrated the continuity between Judaism and Christianity, and pointed out that the religious system of Judaism was divinely inspired and contained worthy examples for Christian living.
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25. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
C. Michael Shea Newman, Perrone, and Möhler on Dogma and History: A Reappraisal of the Newman-Perrone Paper on Development
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This essay, an analysis of the “Newman-Perrone Paper on Development” (1847), argues that previous studies have inflated the differences between the two thinkers with the result that the significant influence of Newman’s theory of development on Perrone’s theology and, subsequently, on the definition of the Immaculate Conception has been overlooked.
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26. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Dwight Lindley Probability and Economy in Newman’s Theory of Knowledge
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This essay considers Newman’s basic epistemology in terms of two of his most important, and often overlooked, sources: Aristotle and the Church Fathers. Inparticular, Newman’s reliance upon Aristotle’s ethical and rhetorical thought on the one hand, and upon the patristic concept of oikonomia on the other, guided him in crafting the well-known account of faith and reason in his thirteenth University Sermon.
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27. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford, c.s.c. Editorial Preface
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28. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Brian W. Hughes Une Source Cachée: Blaise Pascal’s Influence upon John Henry Newman
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This essay breaks new ground by showing that Blaise Pascal exerted a greater influence upon John Henry Newman than scholars have previously acknowledged. Drawing upon recently discovered unpublished information, this essay traces connections between Pascal’s intuitive mind and Newman’s view of implicit reasoning and suggests overlaps between these two thinkers on such topics as the way implicit reasoning operates, the role of evidences in faith, and the need for ethics to guide good reasoning.
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29. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Michael Keating Professors versus Tutors: Pusey and Vaughan at Oxford
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After Newman’s decision to become a Roman Catholic in 1845, Oxford witnessed a fierce battle over the future of the university: would Oxford remain a Christian and Anglican institution, or would it become a purely national, and secular, endeavor? On the Anglican side, the most weighty protagonist was Newman’s former colleague, Edward Pusey. Among those arguing for a national and secular university was Henry Halford Vaughan. In the early 1850s, Pusey and Vaughan engaged in a written controversy, in which they respectively championed a tutorial and a professorial model of learning. However, the issues at stake were much broader than mere pedagogy, and went to the heart of the nature of the institution as a whole.
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30. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Adam Stewart John Henry Newman and Andrew Martin Fairbairn: Philosophical Scepticism and the Efficacy of Reason in The Contemporary Review Exchange
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This essay examines the contrasting conceptualizations of reason in the thought of John Henry Newman and Andrew Martin Fairbairn in their articles published in The Contemporary Review in 1885. This essay articulates both Fairbairn’s charge of philosophical scepticism against Newman as well as Newman’s defense of his position and concomitantly details Fairbairn’s and Newman’s competing notions of the efficacy of reason to provide reliable knowledge of God. The positions of Fairbairn and Newman remain two of the most important perspectives on the role of reason in the acquisition of knowledge about God in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Christian theology.
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31. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Robert Saley Two Models of Figural Historiography: Newman and de Lubac
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This essay investigates the problem of reconciling contingent historical facts and immutable dogma in light of two different models of figural historiography, presented respectively in John Henry Newman’s Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine and Henri de Lubac’s Catholicism: A Study of Dogma in Relation to the Corporate Destiny of Mankind. Although Newman and de Lubac’s approaches to history were quite different, they are fundamentally complementary.
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32. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Vinh Bao Luu-Quang Newman’s Theology of the Economic Trinity in His Parochial and Plain Sermons: 1835–1841
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This sermon-study—a sequel to a previous study of Newman’s theology of the Immanent Trinity, 1829–1834 (NSJ 7/1: 73–86)—examines Newman’s theology of the Trinity in the economy of salvation. Viewing the mystery of the Incarnation as the Revelation of Theologia in Oikonomia, Newman developed a “theology of glorification” and a “theology of within-ness,” which in turn grounded a “theology of Rest and Peace.” Newman’s Trinitarian theology (1835–1841), which was deeply influenced by the Fathers of the Church, was simultaneously his response to the anti-dogmatic Liberalism that rejected Christ’s divinity and so denied the Trinity.
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33. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Alexander Miller The Reasonableness of Faith and Assent in Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons and Grammar of Assent
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Among the most overlooked sources for studying Newman’s epistemology are his sermons, particularly his Parochial and Plain Sermons. This essay compares Newman’s sermon “Religious Faith Rational” (1829) and his discussion of “Simple Assent” in his Grammar of Assent (1870), both of which defend faith or assent in daily life; this comparison reveals both a strong influence of the sermons on the Grammar and a shift in Newman’s understanding of the term “faith.”
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34. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Marcin Kuczok Conceptual Metaphors for the Notion Of Christian Life in John Henry Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons
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From the perspective of cognitive linguistics, metaphor is a way of thinking and understanding rather than an ornamental device used for aesthetic purposes.Conceptual metaphor constitutes a natural device for comprehending those areas of reality that exceed what is describable by literal terms, including especially the sphere of religious experiences. The purpose of this essay is to analyze the conceptual metaphors employed by John Henry Newman in the first volume of his Parochial and Plain Sermons (1834) as a way of explaining the transcendental character of the concept of Christian life.
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35. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
John F. Crosby A “Primer of Infidelity” Based on Newman? A Study of Newman’s Rhetorical Strategy
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Newman often argued like this in debate: “you do not accept this claim of mine because you think that it is exposed to certain objections; but this is unreasonable of you, because you make this other claim which is also, if you think it through, equally exposed to the same kind of objections; therefore, you should either withdraw your objections against me, or else give up that claim that you have been making.” Some contemporaries of Newman thought that he unwittingly lent support to unbelief by defending his views with this “kill-or-cure” argument, as he called it. This essay defends Newman’s argument against his critics in such a way as to contribute to an understanding of Newman’s rhetoric.
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36. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford, c.s.c. Editorial Preface
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37. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Chau Nguyen Encountering Truth: Newman’s Theological Method in An Essay on the Development of Doctrine
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This essay examines the theological method employed by Newman in An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine by considering its objective content and subjective methodology. The objective content concerns the principles of authentic development of doctrine that culminated in his identification of Roman Catholicism as the true Apostolic Church. The subjective methodology consists of his heuristic application of the notes that guided him to the attainment of certitude. Newman’s Essay on Development thus resulted in his conviction in the overpowering vision of truth in the Roman claim in which ecclesial faith is experienced as simultaneously wholly objective and wholly personal.
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38. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Michael P. Krom Gladly to Learn: Teaching Newman’s The Idea of a University
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After reflecting on his own undergraduate education, when the study of Newman’s The Idea of a University led to a transformation of his view of education and even life itself, Michael Krom discusses—in the contemplative spirit that Newman contended to be the purpose of education—how Newman’s Idea can be taught in a way so that today’s students are enlivened with the universal call to Truth and Holiness.
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39. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
I. Michael Bellafiore The Overthrow of Worldly Wisdom and Its Rehabilitation: Newman’s First and Fifteenth Oxford University Sermons
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The first of John Henry Newman’s Oxford University Sermons is often neglected as an integral part of this collection. Yet Newman considered these individual sermons as a unit. There is an important theme that runs unchanged from the first to the last of these Sermons: the primacy of faith over human reason. The main burden of his first Sermon is the need for its hearers to return to their “early, religious training.” Although the worth of human reason is much amplified in his last Sermon, even there faith remains paramount. Newman depicted faith in his fifteenth Sermon as the chief form of human knowledge, as the bedrock and the guarantor of every other form of human knowledge: the one thing necessary is the childlike “obedience of Faith.”
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40. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford Newman’s Reasonable Approach to Faith
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Newman sought a via media—a middle ground—between “evidentialists,” who considered reason supreme and so disparaged faith, and “existentialists,” who wanted to create a fortress of faith impenetrable to reason. Examining the way people actually think, Newman identified three types of inference that lead people to make decisions. This inferential process, which is operative in the decisions of every day life, serves as a paradigm for understanding how the human mind—particularly the illative sense—operates in religious matters; accordingly, Newman presents faith as a personal and reasonable inference.
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