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21. Call to Earth: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Ed Mooney Earth as Sacred Site—The Bearing of Defilement: A Case in Point
22. Call to Earth: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Michael E. Zimmerman Perception, Incarnation, and Transformation: Sacred Images of Human Corporeality
23. Call to Earth: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Gail Stenstad Holy Earth, Whole Thinking
24. Call to Earth: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Maxine Sheets-Johnstone Origins of the Sacred in the Paleolithic
25. Call to Earth: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Bruce V. Foltz Nature's Other Side: The Demise of Nature and the Phenomenology of Givenness
26. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Editorial Guidance/IAEP Website url
27. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Call To Earth Mission Statement
28. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Ingrid Leman Stefanovic From the Editors
29. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Report on Books
30. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Ingrid Leman Stefanovic What Is An Ethic Of Place?
31. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Ralph Acampora Oikos And Domus: On Constructive Co-Habitation with Other Creatures
32. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Dennis Skocz Wilderness, the Wild, and Nature Made Homely
33. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Leslie Van Gelder The Philosophy of Place: The Power of Story
34. Call to Earth: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
David Seamon Connections That Have A Quality Of Necessity: Goethe's Way Of Science As A Phenomenology Of Nature
35. The Digital Scholar: Philosopher's Lab: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Vladimir A. Kutyrev Владимир Александрович Кутырев
Husserl’s Transcendental Phenomenology as a Philosophical Foresight of the Information Era
Трансцендентальная Феноменология Гуссерля Как Философское Предшествие Информационной Эпохи

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In this paper, we suggest an updated idea about the development of philosophy in the twentieth century. Its historical meaning is in the transition from metaphysics to transcendentalism, from the realistic model of the world to the postmodernist one. We demonstrate that transcendental phe-nomenology is a forerunner of structural and in-formation revolutions. It developed the catego-ries that appear speculative counter-parts of the conceptual apparatus of informationalism. The “keyword” of phenomenology is noe-ma = a thing of consciousness = a mental con-sciousness thing, which is information about a thing. Transcenden-tal-cognitive modelling turns all things into num-bers. It results in a denial of humanity and their life-world by technoscience. Husserl seems to be the first ideologist and, at the same time, the first criticist of the Transmodern era.
36. The Digital Scholar: Philosopher's Lab: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
M. Weller Мартин Веллер
The Digital Scholar Revisited
Цифровой Ученый: Новое Прочтение

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The book The Digital Scholar was published in 2011, and used Boyer’s framework of scholarship to examine the possible impact of digital, networked technology on scholarly practice. In 2011 the general attitude towards digital scholarship was cautious, although areas of innovative prac-tice were emerging. Using this book as a basis, the author considers changes in digital scholarship since its publication. Five key themes are identified: mainstreaming of digital scholarship, so that it is a widely accepted and encouraged practice; the shift to open, with the emphasis on the benefits that open practice brings rather than the digital or networked aspects; policy implementation, particularly in areas of educational technology platforms, open access policies and open educational resources; network identity, emphasising the development of academic identity through social media and other tools; criticality of digital scholarship, which examines the negative issues associated with online abuse, privacy and data usage. Each of these themes is explored, and their impact in terms of Boyer’s original framing of scholarly activity considered. Boyer’s four scholarly activities of discovery, integration, application and teaching can be viewed from the perspective of these five themes. In conclusion what has been realised does not con-stitute a revolution in academic practice, but rather a gradual acceptance and utilisation of digi-tal scholarship techniques, practices and values. It is simultaneously true that both radical change has taken place, and nothing has fundamentally altered. Much of the increased adoption in academia mirrors the wider penetration of social media tools amongst society in general, so academics are more likely to have an identity in such places that mixes professional and personal.
37. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Charles Hartshorne The Rights of the Subhuman World
38. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Eugene C. Hargrove How, When, Where, and Why
39. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Daniel Lehocky The Limits of Altruism: An Ecologist’s View of Survival
40. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Mark Sagoff Private Property and the Constitution