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21. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
R. Scott Smith Craig, Anti-Platonism, and Objective Morality
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Though William Lane Craig believes his anti-Platonism is compatible with objective, Christian morality, I argue that it is not. First, I survey the main contours of his nominalism. Second, I discuss how he sees those points in relation to objective, Christian morality. Then, I argue that his view cannot sustain the qualitative aspects of moral virtues or principles, or even human beings. Moreover, Craig’s view loses any connection between those morals and humans, thereby doing great violence to objective, Christian morals. Finally, I sketch two advantages of a Platonic realism in regards to Christian morals.
... as the doctrine that uncreated, metaphysically abstract objects (AOs) exist, fatally ... on the Problem of God and Abstract Objects (New York: Bloomsbury, 2014). They include ... , metaphysically abstract objects (AOs) exist. However, they would rival God ...
22. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Alvin Plantinga Response to William Lane Craig’s Review of Where the Conflict Really Lies: Science, Religion, and Naturalism
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I try to clear up a couple of misunderstandings in William Craig’s review (misunderstandings due, perhaps, to expository inadequacy on my part). The first has to do with the difference between what I call “Historical Biblical Criticism” and historical scholarship. I claim there is conflict between the first and Christian belief; I don’t for a moment think there is conflict between historical scholarship and Christian belief. The second has to do with Platonism, theism and causality. I point out that theism has the resources to see abstract objects as like divine thoughts, in which case they are not causally isolated; this offers a reply to Paul Benacerraf’s suggestion that if, as on Platonism, abstract objects are causally isolated from everything, then there is no way in which we could come to know them or anything about them.
... the resources to see abstract objects as like divine thoughts, in which case ... , as on Platonism, abstract objects are causally isolated from everything, then there is no way ... that theism has the resources to see abstract objects as like divine ...
23. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Keith Yandell God and Propositions
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If there are abstract objects, they necessarily exist. The majority view among contemporary philosophers of religion who are theists is that God also necessarily exists. Nonetheless, that God has necessary existence has not been shown to be true, or even (informally) consistent. It seems consistent—at least is does not seem (informally) inconsistent—but neither does its denial. Arguments that necessary existence is a perfection, and God has all perfections, assume that Necessitarian Theism is true, and hence consistent. Thus they do not provide reason to believe that Necessitarian Theism is true. Nonnecessitarian (“plain”) theism is on a philosophical par with Necessitarian Theism and can accommodate abstract objects all the while avoiding theological and philosophical refutation.
...If there are abstract objects, they necessarily exist. The majority view among ... with Necessitarian Theism and can accommodate abstract objects all the while avoiding theological ... –Madison The overall question at hand is how God is related to abstract objects ...
24. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Peter van Inwagen Did God Create Shapes?
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I defend the thesis that at least some abstract objects are uncreated. I choose to discuss a rather neglected category of abstract object, shapes. I choose to discuss shapes because I think the members of my audience may have fewer metaphysical preconceptions about shapes than about, e.g., numbers or propositions or attributes.
...I defend the thesis that at least some abstract objects are uncreated. I choose ... am going to discuss abstract objects. In particular, I am going to discuss ... : I defend the thesis that at least some abstract objects are uncreated. I choose ...
25. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Walter Schultz Toward a Realist Modal Structuralism: A Christian Philosophy of Mathematics
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The aim of this paper is to propose a philosophy of mathematics that takes structures to be basic. It distinguishes between mathematical structures and real structures. Mathematical structures are the propositional content either of consistent axiom systems or (algebraic or differential) equations. Thus, mathematical structures are logically possible structures. Real structures—and the mathematical structures that represent them—are related essentially to God’s plan in Christ and ultimately grounded in God’s awareness of his ability. However, not every mathematical structure has a correlative real structure. Mathematical structures are either true or fictional, yet all are possible.
.... (4) Abstract objects depend on God’s awareness of his ability ... and antirealists over the status of abstract objects in general. So ... conceptualism regarding the existence and nature of abstract objects ...
26. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Craig Hazen Editor’s Introduction
... members weighing in on the debate over God and abstract objects. Then it ...
27. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Adam Lloyd Johnson Introduction to the American Academy of Religion Panel Forum on Erik Wielenberg’s Robust Ethics
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Erik Wielenberg is the most important contemporary critic of theistic metaethics. Wielenberg maintains that God is unnecessary for objective morality because moral truths exist as brute facts of the universe that have no, and need no, foundation. At times his description of these brute facts make them sound like abstract objects or Platonic forms. At the American Academy of Religion’s annual meeting in Boston in November of 2017, we organized an Evangelical Philosophical Society panel to discuss Erik Wielenberg’s book Robust Ethics: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Godless Normative Realism. All five papers presented there are included in this journal.
... of these brute facts make them sound like abstract objects or Platonic forms. At the American ... description of these brute facts make them sound much like abstract objects ... , foundation. At times his description of these brute facts make them sound like abstract ...
28. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
William Lane Craig An Aristotelian Realist Philosophy of Mathematics: Mathematics as the Science of Quantity and Structure
.... For he rejects the existence of abstract objects, maintaining ... the reality of abstract objects such as classes. But in the contemporary debate ... the reality of abstract objects. Franklin conflates the contemporary and medieval ...
29. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Robin Collins Theism or Pantheism?: A Review Essay on John Leslie’s Infinite Minds
... as abstract objects, then they either exist inside the mind of Leslie’s God (as ... as abstract objects in the divine mind, not as fully actual worlds ... as abstract objects in the divine mind, the possible world ...
30. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Craig J. Hazen Editor’s Introduction
... to the emerging debate over abstract objects. Here is a quick word to those ...
31. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Angus Menuge Knowledge of Abstracta: A Challenge to Materialism
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I argue that materialism is unable to account for knowledge deriving from such abstracta as rules of inference, algorithms, and the ideals of infinity, perfection, and eternity. Both reductive and nonreductive materialism subscribe to the causal closure of the physical world, which implies that a creature’s concepts derive exclusively from the interactions of brains with the physical environment. These resources do not explain the acquisition of abstract concepts or the successful use of these concepts in gaining important knowledge about the world. By contrast, if both God and souls exist, we can understand how knowledge based on abstracta is possible.
... that there are no abstract objects and hence no such thing as knowledge of them ... . In response, I argue that abstract objects are indispensable ... , a realm of abstract objects and relations that supply ...
32. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Paul M. Gould Theistic Activism and the Doctrine of Creation
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This paper provides a plausible answer to the question of how God created. In addition, it explores an additional reason, beyond those related to the debate over God’s relationship to abstract objects, for thinking theistic activism true. Specifically, a new model of God’s creative activity—the activist model—will be offered that satisfies key desiderata with respect to the nature of God’s perfect power to create.
...’s relationship to abstract objects, for thinking theistic activism true. Specifically, a new ... Platonism face a dilemma. Either affirm uncreated abstract objects ... that there are uncreated abstract objects, is . . . wholly unacceptable theologically ...
33. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
William Lane Craig Mathematics and Reality
...’s “indispensability argument” for the existence of abstract objects ... that such a dismissal of abstract objects is much too quick, since it ignores any ... potential extrascientific grounds for embracing abstract objects ...
34. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Allen Gehring Truthmaking, Truthbearers, and Divine Simplicity
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Recent work using the idea of truthmaking to articulate the doctrine of divine simplicity has not paid enough attention to truthbearers. I address this issue by challenging the assumption that God’s simplicity needs to be conceived as an all-or-nothing matter. For it is possible to distinguish between a weak and a strong version of divine simplicity, and there are reasons regarding truthbearers that provide reason to uphold, at most, the weak version. The weak version of divine simplicity articulated here has some similarities with the view of God advocated by Modified Theistic Activists, but it has important differences as well.
... discussion involving God and the problem of abstract objects. Abstract ...
35. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Richard Davis God and the Platonic Horde: A Defense of Limited Conceptualism
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In this paper I shall argue two things. First, it is plausible to think that Conceptualism holds with respect to propositions; in any event, it does a much better job than its closest competitors (Platonism and Nominalism) in accounting for the truthbearing nature of propositions. Secondly, it is wholly implausible (so I say) to take the added step and equate properties and relations with divine concepts. Here I offer additional reasons, beyond “divine bootstrapping,” for theists to resist this tempting reduction. Thus, a limited Conceptualism emerges as the most natural and defensible way for a theist to think about God’s relation to abstract objects.
... for a theist to think about God’s relation to abstract objects. ... by giving examples. Abstract objects (AOs) are said to be impersonal ... to think about God’s relation to abstract objects. Recipe ...
36. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Walter Schultz Truth and Truthmakers
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This paper introduces, explains, and defends a theory of truth and truthmakers comprising the following four claims: (1) Truth is God’s knowledge. (2) A proposition p is true if and only if what it represents as “being the case” is a constituent k of God’s knowledge. Otherwise, it is either fictionally false or purely false. (3) Constituents of God’s knowledge are the truthmakers for true propositions. Thus, for every p, p is true if and only if some k makes p true. (4) The set T of all true propositions is included in God’s knowledge.
... of abstract objects “outside” of God. 4 Furthermore, God’s awareness of his ... hoard of abstract objects are not what they seem to be. “Abstract ... that they are abstract objects, which ultimately are divine thoughts. Alvin ...
37. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
James N. Anderson, Greg Welty The Lord of Noncontradiction: An Argument for God from Logic
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In this paper we offer a new argument for the existence of God. We contend that the laws of logic are metaphysically dependent on the existence of God, understood as a necessarily existent, personal, spiritual being; thus anyone who grants that there are laws of logic should also accept that there is a God. We argue that if our most natural intuitions about them are correct, and if they are to play the role in our intellectual activities that we take them to play, then the laws of logic are best construed as necessarily existent thoughts—more specifically, as divine thoughts about divine thoughts. We conclude by highlighting some implications for both theistic arguments and antitheistic arguments.
..., “Theistic Conceptual Realism: The Case for Interpreting Abstract Objects ... the question against those who hold that there exist abstract objects ... of abstract objects cannot be settled by mere definitional fiat. Bob Hale, “Abstract ...
38. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
J. P. Moreland Body, Soul & Life Everlasting: Biblical Anthropology and the Monism-Dualism Debate
... entities, e.g., various abstract objects, spirits. Thus, we cannot adequately ...
39. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 5 > Issue: 1
Howard Robinson Universals
...,” “Traditional Realism: Properties as Abstract Objects,” “Traditional Realism ...
40. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Randal Rauser A Sensible Metaphysical Realism
... that conceptual schemes are abstract objects, the regress then falls ...