Displaying: 181-200 of 560 documents

0.111 sec

181. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Leonard Swidler Christian-Marxist Dialogue: An Uneven Past - A Reviving Present - A Necessary Future
182. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Hugh Lacey Understanding the Aspirations of the Central American Liberation Movements
183. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Stephen J. Casey Christian Love and Just War: Moral Paradox and Political Life in St. Augustine and His Modern Interpreters
184. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Miron Wolnicki The Decolonization of Poland
185. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
John F. Kavanaugh, S.J., Maura A. Ryan The Ethics of Embryo Adoption and the Catholic Tradition: Moral Arguments, Economic Reality and Social Analysis
186. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Patrick Henry Religion For Peace: The Vietnam Years And Today
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this essay, I examine the religious peace activists during the war in Vietnam: Catholic (Daniel Berrigan, Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton), Jewish (Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel), Protestant (Martin Luther King, Jr.) and Buddhist (Thich Nhat Hanh) who, together with many others, constituted the greatest example of interfaith peace activism in our nation’s history. I extract from their writings principles that would enable us to create an interfaith peace movement today in a world desperately in need of such ecumenical activity. Recently the worldwide Muslim community has called upon Christian and Jewish clerics and scholars to enter into an interfaith dialogue with them for purposes of peace. “Without peace and justice between [our] two communities,” these 138 Islamic scholars and clerics wrote to their Christian counterparts in October 2007, communities that constitute 55% of the world’s population, “there can be no meaningful peace in the world.” Christian and Jewish religious leaders and scholars have responded with wholehearted enthusiasm to the Muslim initiative. Judeo-Christian reconciliation in the 1960s in the wake of the Holocaust, which accomplished what must have been judged impossible only twenty years earlier, should be the model used to bring together all the major religions in the present century. In a spirit of respect and reverence, trust and reconciliation, with recognition of the holiness of all the major religions and in opposition to exclusivist conceptions of salvation and without any desire to convert others to one’s religion, this Islamic invitation to dialogue and peacemaking must be vigorously pursued and developed within the communities of all relevant nations where interfaith groups must be established in mosques, temples, churches and synagogues, for teaching, discussion and joint good works in peace and justice activities.
187. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Teresa G. Wojcik Incorporating Catholic Social Teaching in the College Classroom: Connecting Pedagogy of the Oppressed and Justice in the World
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Published within a year of one another, Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970) and Justice in the World (1971) echo very similar themes, including oppression,structural injustice, and a concern for human rights and dignity. The documents also share comparable views concerning the role of schools in engenderingsocietal transformation. Both texts recommend an education which develops critical consciousness in students through a pedagogy of dialogue and praxis.Such an approach to education encourages the poor and marginalized to overcome fatalistic outlooks, which keep them subordinated, and empowers them to actively engage in their own liberation. The author shares how coupling these two texts in her college course provided a means for introducing Catholic Social Teaching into the curriculum and enriching the learning experience of her students. She explains how Pedagogy of the Oppressed might be used to foreground Justice in the World and why this exercise constitutes a useful academic endeavor. The article concludes by asserting that the principles and documents of Catholic Social Teaching possess broad cross-curricular significance and that faculty should consider incorporating them into their syllabi.
188. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Irene Langran George Bush’s Foreign Aid: Transformation or Chaos?
189. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Joan Wile Held In The Light
190. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Catherine Kolongowski Living Beyond War A Citizen’s Guide
191. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Contributors
192. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
CL Nash Ancestral Grace
193. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Gail M. Presbey The African Element in Gandhi
194. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Ora Szekely A Palestinian Christian Cry for Reconciliation
195. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Richard Jacobs, O.S.A. Ensuring that Education Remains a Human Right in the United States: Upholding the Prior Parental Right in the Education of Their Children
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article considers the topic of the prior parental right in the education of their children, unequivocally asserted in the United Nations’ Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, Article 26, subsection 3). Discussion focuses upon the origins and nature of this right as it is described in Catholic Church teaching as well as the Supreme Court’s 1925 decision in Pierce v. Society of Sisters, both of which antedate and provide principled support for UDHR’s assertion. The purpose here is to use these principles to identify the injustice arising when a State or its agents deny parental choice in education by limiting that choice to public schools. In the United States, this action imperils the foundation of UDHR’s goal that education be “the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.”
196. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Gary Chamberlain Sustainability and Water: A New Water Ethos
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper the author examines a new water ethos focused on sustainability within the parameters of a deep, green Christianity. The discussion begins witha brief outline of the problems facing water due to unsustainable practices and policies. At present paces the peoples, creatures, plants, and minerals of the world are at great risk of losing the nourishment of water needed to survive.The second portion begins with an overview of the complex values toward nature in the Christian tradition. The author then develops three approaches for a new water ethos to guide decisions around sustainability and water. In the third approach of deep, green Christianity, the theological basis for a water ethos involves new understandings of Holy Spirit in relation to nature. Finally the author offers a revision of Catholic Social Teachings to serve as an ethical framework for sustainability of the environment and water.
197. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Nancy C. Sharts-Hopko The Wanderers
198. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Editor’s Note
199. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 1
Masako Nakagawa The Radical Bible
200. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Kiku Huckle Political Hypocrisy: The Mask of Power, From Hobbes to Orwell and Beyond