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161. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Michael J. Barga Social Work and Cultural Competency with Roman Catholics
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Since the 1970s, issues in the political realm of the United States have increasingly created tension within religious communities including the Roman Catholic (RC) community. The divisions in the RC community are areas of difference which can lead to discrimination. While such divisions may always exist, the way in which these areas of difference within the RC community are recognized will play a factor in determining the level of discrimination experienced by RC individuals in different environments. This article will review how the term Catholic has been described in social work and related literature, which will enable a discussion of the future for social work in relating to differences within the RC community. The hope is for the social work profession to acknowledge areas of difference within the RC community and the potential for discrimination which occurs based on differing perspectives. By promoting a less political lexicon for tense topics and identifying areas of difference, the hope is to foster a respect for RCs of all opinions within the social work profession.
162. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Peter J. Colosi The HHS Mandate: A Question of Religious Freedom of the Life Issues?
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This three-part article will discuss: (1) The approach of the U.S. bishops in order to thank them and praise their efforts against the HHS Mandate, while at the same time respectfully pointing out a certain oversight in their approach; (2) some reasons not often mentioned for which the Obama Administration is enacting the HHS mandate; and (3) some ideas on how most wisely to approach the question of contraception in the midst of the fight for religious freedom. The article, written in 2012, is preceded by a preface outlining key developments in the intervening years between 2012 and 2015 and explaining the importance of looking now at a clear snapshot of where we were three years ago.
163. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
David F. Dieteman F. A. Hayek's Missing Piece: Christianity
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Friedrich Hayek is one of the most influential political philosophers of the twentieth century. A 1974 Nobel Prize winner for Economics, Hayek argues for the superiority of the free society over totalitarian, planned societies. Although Hayek arguably hit his target, he missed the bull’s-eye, because he failed to explain government and its prudential limits with reference to a complete view of human nature. This is partly because he failed to recognize that Christianity is the essence of Western civilization.
164. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Fr. Lawrence J. Donohoo S.T.L. Some Observations on Method, Object, and Remedies in Catholic Social Science
165. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Robert F. Gorman Revisiting Karl Jaspers's Axial Age Hypothesis: Natural Law as a Missing Link
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This article argues that Karl Jaspers’s account of the rise of the Axial Age phenomenon is deficient owing to his failure to consider the natural law as a plausible cause for its development. The Axial Age concept—which precedes Jaspers, who nevertheless popularized it—claims that widely separated civilizations from the Ancient Greeks and Hebrews to the Persian, Hindu, Buddhist, and Confucian cultures all began to display sophisticated political and moral development from 800–200 BC, without any known contact. Jaspers regarded its rise as a mystery. However, given ancient legal codes containing moral precepts long predating this period, the natural law hypothesis serves as the most plausible explanation of this ‘mystery’ of mankind’s dawning moral awareness.
166. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Emil B. Berendt Andrew V. Abela and Joseph E. Capizzi (eds.), A Catechism for Business: Tough Ethical Questions & Insights from Catholic Teaching
167. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
William Zehringer Jorge Mario Bergoglio (Pope Francis), Education for Choosing Life: Proposals for Difficult Times. Trans. Deborah Cole
168. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Hanael Bianchi Jay P. Corrin, Catholic Progressives in England After Vatican II
169. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Richard S. Myers Stephen M. Krason (editor), The Crisis of Religious Liberty: Reflections from Law, History, and Catholic Social Thought
170. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Mary Clare Imparato Paul Farmer and Gustavo Gutierrez, In the Company of the Poor
171. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Adam Tate John C. Pinheiro, Missionaries of Republicanism: A Religious History of the Mexican-American War
172. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Joshua W. Schulz Wilfred M. McClay and Ted V. McAllister (editors), Why Place Matters: Geography, Identity, and Civic Life in Modern America
173. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Regis Martin John E. Thiel, Icons of Hope: The “Last Things” in Catholic Imagination
174. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Robert F. Gorman S. Adam Seagrave, The Foundations of Natural Morality: On the Compatibility of Natural Rights and the Natural Law
175. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
David M. Klocek Andrew Roberts, Napoleon: A Life
176. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason Presidential Power: A Rescuer, Not a Nemesis
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2014 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). He argues that, despite the criticism of President Obama’s seemingly excessive exercise of executive power to further an ideologically leftist secularist agenda, the strong and maybe unprecedented use of presidential power after him may be the most certain way to try to restore weakened American constitutional principles and traditional liberties and to begin to reverse our serious cultural decay.
177. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason What Seems to Be a Morally-Mandated Public Policy Position Really May Note Be
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2014 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). It discusses how Catholic social teaching does not mandate particular public policies and must not be confused with a point of the teaching itself. It emphasizes that there can typically be many different policy approaches that can be used to make sure that moral demands are met.
178. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason In Memoriam: Charles E. Rice (1931-2015)
179. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason The Wrong Notion of Who and What Is God: At the Core of Modern Political Turmoil
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2014 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). He argues that the common strain running through such political developments as the rise of Islamism, modern political ideologies, and contemporary leftism is the fact that, one way or the other, they represent man trying to make himself God. To paraphrase Irving Babbitt and others, as the notion of God goes, so goes philosophy, and society and culture, and politics, and economics—the religious outlook is at the core of all other perspectives.
180. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Ryan J. Barilleaux Speaking Truth to POTUS: Presidents, Politics, and the Pope
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Since the pontificate of St. John Paul II, the Pope has been a leader of world significance, which brings the Holy Father into contact with the President of the United States (POTUS). John Paul II dealt with five chief executives. The recent history of presidential-papal interactions suggests five roles into which Presidents cast the Pope and three lessons about the relationship between POTUS and Peter.